Skip to item: of 616

'Administration Reports 1905-1910' [‎21v] (47/616)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 volume (304 folios). It was created in 1907-1911. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

26

ADMINISTKATION EEPOIlT ON THE PERSIAN GOLF POLITICAL

Though comparative quiet now reigned in Shiraz for about a
fortnight, there was still a ^ood deal of lawlessness prevalent, and this took
the troublesome form of Jew-baiting. On 7th February, Monsieur Veneziani,
an Italian Jew and leader of the community, reported that an attack on his
co-religionists was arranged for the morrow, and solicited protection for his
house 0 in which large quantities of Jewish merchandise were stored for safety,
la pursuance of this request Mr. Grahame and his Consular Escort spent the
night in the house of a European adjoining his premises. Nothing however
occurred and for some days, during the general rejoicing at the apparent
supersession of the Shoa-es-Sultaneh, the Jews were forgotten; but this did,
not endure for a long time and about 20th February the Italian again
complained that his servants were constantly beaten and robbed in the
bazaar.
Contrary to expectation the first ten days of the Mohurrum, which com
menced at the end of February, passed without any incident except that the Jews
were still oppressed and confined to their own quarters and were informed by
the local authorities that their security could only be guaranteed by payment
of 1,000 tomans by the community.
The general position continued much the same until the end of the year
owins? to the uncertainty which still continued to exist as to whether His
Imperial Highness the Shoa-es-Sultaneh had really relinquished the idea of
returning to Fars or whether he still had the ear of his father and meditated
return when opportunity offered.
The town and district of Behbehan, nominally under the Fars Govern
ment, was in a hardly less turbulent state than the capital of the province,
and the Shiraz Authorities were able to exercise no effective control over the
anarchy which prevailed.
There can be little doubt that in these efforts^ to emancipate themselves
from the intolerable burden of rapacious oppression under which they suffer,
the people of Fars have been emboldened by the success of the revolutionary
movement in Russia; and for this reason they will not be appeased so easily
with empty promises as they have been in the past.
Visits of vessels Bushire was visited by the three "subsidised" gunboats Sphinx,
ofHisMajesty's^ • an(i Redbreast. One of these vessels remained on duty at
Navy and the ancl in ^ shatt-el-Arab throughout the seven months ending March
1906, in connection with the patrolling of the river during the date-shipping
season and the murder of a British Engineer in Messrs, Lynch's workshops
at Marghill above Busreh.
Vice-Admiral Sir Edmund Foe, K.C.V.O., Commander-in-Chief of the
East Indies Station, who arrived in the Gulf with his Flagship Eermes
in the middle of March after attending the departure of Their Eoyal
Highnesses the Frince and Frincess of Wales from Karachi on the termination
(,f their Indian tour, had not yet reached Bushire when the year under report
closed,
R.I.M S. Lawrence was on duty with the Resident throughout the
year as usual, and R.I.M,S. Investigator on arrival from Bombay on 29th
September proceeded with the survey of Koweit Harbour, leaving again on
13th December to avoid the very cold weather in the Gulf during which in
the previous season the crew had shown a tendency to develop Beri-beri.
No vessels of Foreign Navies visited
Foreign Men-of-war. Bushire during the year.
Major F. Z. Cox, C.I.E., retained his post throughout the year and there
was no change in the personnel of the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. except as regards the
Second Assistant Lieutenant C. H. Gabriel, who had assumed charge on 26th
March 1905, left for India on 15th January .1906, after handing over charge
to Lieutenant R. L. Bird wood.
Foreign Monsieur N. Passek, Consul-General for Russia, remained at his post
representatives, ^j-oughout the year, but spent the summer at Shiraz.
Herr Von Mutius, the Acting German Consul, left on 8th May for
Germany, Dr. Listemann from Tehran taking his place.

Navy
Royal Indian
Marine

Official
changesi

About this item

Content

The volume contains Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for 1905-1906 (Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India, 1907); Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1906-1907 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1908); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and the Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1907-1908 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1909); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and the Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for April-December1908 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1909); Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year Ending 31st December 1909 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1911); and Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. for the Year 1910 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1911).

The Reports contain reviews by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. and chapters on each of the consulates, agencies, and other administrative regions that made up the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. . The Reports contain information on political developments, territorial divisions, local administration, principal tribes, British personnel and appointments, trade and commerce, naval and marine matters, communications, judicial matters, archaeology, pearl fisheries, the slave trade, arms and ammunition traffic, medical matters and public health, oil, notable visitors and events, meteorological data, and related topics.

Extent and format
1 volume (304 folios)
Arrangement

There is a list of contents at the front of each Report.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at 1 on the front cover and terminates at 306 on the back cover. These numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and can be found in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. The following folios need to be folded out to be read: ff. 40, 261.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Administration Reports 1905-1910' [‎21v] (47/616), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/710, in Qatar Digital Library <http://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023487519.0x000030> [accessed 7 December 2016]

Link to this record
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.
http://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002ac/manifest
More options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image