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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2381] (898/1262)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (1165 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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2381

It is reported that there are no Sufis in the districts of the Persian Sufis and
coasts but that a few members of the sect of Ni^mat 'Ali are met with at
Bushehr.
According'to information supplied by His Highness the Agha Khan in Bakttsia.
1901, some itinerant preachers, belonging to a pantheistic (sic) Muham-
madan order known as the Baktasis, who were said to be numerous in
European and Asiatic Turkey, had in recent years visited northern Central
Arabia; but they had obtained little success among the people and were
suspected to be in reality political emissaries of the Porte.

Jews in the Persian Guif region.
The characteristics of the Jews of Turkish ^Iraq are described in the Turkish
article on that province in the Geographical Volume of the present 'Iraq.
Gazetteer; they are distinguished, perhaps not unnaturally, by their
bigotry in religious matters. Their distribution appears to be somewhat
as in the following table, few of them, however, it should be remarked,
being found outside towns ;—

Wilayat.

Qadha.

Souls.

Baghdad .

'Aziziyah .....

A few.

Do.

Baghdad ....

55,000

Do.

Hiliah

500

Do.

Hindiyah

500

Do.

Jazlrah

A few.

Do.

Karbala

300

Do.

Kut-al-Araarah

100

Do.

Samawah

200

Basrah

'Amarah

1,000

Do.

Basrah

2,000

Do.

Hai^

500

Do.

Nasiriyah

150

Do.

Shatrat-al-'AmRrah

50

Do.

Shatrat-al-Muntafik

A few.

Do.

Suq-ash-ShuyukV.

300

Total about .

61,000

On the Arabian coast of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. there are between 100 and 200
Jews at Kuwait, about 50 in Bahrain, and several at Masqat. On the
Persian coast Jews are not numerous, there being only a handful at
Muhammareh, about 600 at Bushehr, and a few in the Gabandi vallev.
In all there are probably less than 62,000 Jews in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region.
Jews have of recent years been badly treated in Persia, and a number
have emigrated to other countries. There are three Jewish shrines of
importance in the countries adjacent to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , namely the
tombs of Ezekiel and Ezra in Turkish ^Iraq at Kifl and ^Azair respec-
tively, of which the former is greatly venerated and is the scene of many
Jewish burials, and the tomb of Daniel near Shush in "'Arabistan.

About this item

Content

This volume is Volume I, Part II (Historical) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part II contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914, 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (pags v-viii), and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (ix-cxxx). These are also found in Volume I, Part IA of the Gazetteer (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1).

Part II consists of three chapters:

  • 'Chapter X. History of ’Arabistān' (pages 1625-1775);
  • 'Chapter XI. History of the Persian Coast and Islands' (pages 1776-2149);
  • 'Chapter XII. History of Persian Makrān' (pages 2150-2203).

The chapters are followed by nineteen appendices:

Extent and format
1 volume (1165 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part II is arranged into chapters that are sub-divided into numbered periods covering, for example, the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The appendices are sub-divided into lettered subject headings and also contain numbered annexures, as well as charts. Both the chapters and appendices have further subject headings that appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally througout the volume at the bottom of the page which provide further details and references. A 'Detailed Table of Contents' for Part II and the Appendices is on pages cii-cxxx.

Physical characteristics

The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 879, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1503.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2381] (898/1262), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, in Qatar Digital Library <http://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023514764.0x000060> [accessed 21 September 2016]

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