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'File W/4 Hostilities in Persia: Tangistan Blockade; Confiscation of Tea for Tangistan' [‎24v] (46/411)

The record is made up of 1 file (203 folios). It was created in 28 Jul 1915-30 Jul 1918. It was written in English, French, Arabic and Persian. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Enclosure No. 3,

Extract from the 0 Tazianeh No, 24, dated the 6th Ramzan 1333.
The pressure and intrigues of the English.
The silence of the Government against all their illegal transgressions has
filled the cup of the Persians* patience to the brim, and the volunteers of
XMshti, Dashtistan, Chahkutah and Tangistan, who have for some time past
nuited in obedience to the decrees of the High Ulema for the preservation of
the realms of Islam have attacked the British Consulate-General at Bushire.
Although they were being constantly fired at from the sea and land, they did
not fear death and attacked so enthusiastically in the cause of the preserv
ation of the Sacred Law that two officers and five Indian sowars were killed,
their arms were carried away ; other numbers of the killed and wounded in the
bangurs of the enemy are unknown. The volunteers had no casualties and
returned to their places according to the order of the Commander.
According to a telegram from Borasjun the artillery fire of the British,
continues on the place where the volunteers were. It is believed that, if the
Uovernment take action immediately to bring the Germans back and expel
the English, this matter will not take long and it will be in the interests of the
l^uglish*

Enclosure No. 4..
Telegram.
Extract from the Tazicmeh", So. 24, dated Shiraz, 6th Eamzan 1333
(Wth July lOloJ.
To
His Excellency the Governor-General of Ears.
Copies to the Kazeruni Mujtahid, Agha Sayyed Jafar, Agha Shaikh Jafar,,
Agha Shaikh Murteza, Agha Shaikh Muhsin, the Qawam-ul-Mulk, the
Supreme Court of Justice, the Gendarmerie Department, the " Jam-i-Jam
the Tazianehthe Socialist Moderates, and the holy committee of the
Democrats, Shiraz.
With a view to preserving the prestige of Islam and independence of the
dominions of Persia and to blocking the paths for the pretexts and intrigues
of the foreigners and to the delicate positioa of neutrality merely for the sake
of God,. w 7 e volunteered to make peace between the Khans of Dashtistan and
we made up our minds at Kazerun to remove by whatever means the
antagonism on both sides and to get them to conclude peace and unite
sincerely with each other, and to guard against the critical situation, and to
get them to assist in the execution of the Government's orders.
We divided ourselves in two parties, and some of us visited the Gh^zanfar-
us-Sultaneh, while the other one, the Chief one, visited Ismail Khan. We
made a truce of hostilities for the time being. We were first under the im
pression that the tiame of the trouble was perhaps actuated by a desire on the
part of both parties to acquire each other's territories. After obtaining full,
information regarding the geography of the territories of both sides, we put
iorward the terms of peace. Indeed Agha Khan and Ghazanlar-us-Sultaneii
and the other Khans allied with them accepted them, and showed themselves
ready to unite with each other and not to allow the intrigues of foreigners to
shake the neutrality of the Peisian Government.
Although Ismail Khan at first was ready to make peace, but unfortunate
ly Muhammad Khan of ilaiat Daud, who had come with his forces under
instructions from Haidar Khan to assist him, seduced the latter with the help
of Mr. Cox, and his own co-operation. He ignored our peaceful measures and
sincere efforts and relused to make peace. The poor fool has been won over
by the force of the rifles and ammunition of the British. We did not at all
lose any opportunity to elfect peace, but to our regret it had no eUcct and we
liave now arrived at Borasjun m despair.

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Content

This file contains correspondence between the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain and the British Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Bushire, as well as Sheikh ‘Isā bin ‘Alī Āl Khalifah, ruler of Bahrain, and Sheikh Qāsim bin Mahzā’, Qāḍī of Bahrain.

The correspondence concerns the anti-British revolt of the Tangsiri and Qashqai tribes, headed by Ra’īs ‘Alī Dalvārī under the influence of Wilhelm Wassmuss, and the aftermath of their attack on the British Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at Bushire on 12 July 1915. Included within the correspondence are: letters concerning the occupation of the town of Bushire, British counter-raids and the death of Ra’īs ‘Alī Delvārī; the imposition of a blockade on Tangsiri boats operating in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; statements and customs papers (Acquit de Sortie and Permis de Cabotage) from various Bahraini and Persian nākhudā s (dhow boat captains) gathered by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ; the arrest and detention of Yūsuf Fakhrū on suspicion of political dealings with Germany; attacks against British diplomatic missions and residents in Persia, including Shiraz and Isfahan; and information concerning German activities in Persia during the First World War.

Extent and format
1 file (203 folios)
Arrangement

This file is arranged approximately in chronological order.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: Foliation is written in pencil, in the top right corner of each folio. It begins with the first item of correspondence, on number 2, and runs through to 201, ending on the inside of the back cover of the volume.

Written in
English, French, Arabic and Persian in Latin and Arabic script
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'File W/4 Hostilities in Persia: Tangistan Blockade; Confiscation of Tea for Tangistan' [‎24v] (46/411), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/50, in Qatar Digital Library <http://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023813429.0x00002e> [accessed 29 June 2017]

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