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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2245] (762/1262)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (1165 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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if^C
2245
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lOlCtf'
( f ^ere free to allThe total gains of the party during the days that they
bad been at work were represented by 23 small seed pearls only.
The affair^ however^ was reported to have given rise to some
apprehension among the pearl divers of Bahrain^ and it led to a full
discussion of policy between tLj Government of Bombay From c. 1668-1858, the East India Company’s administration in the city of Bombay [Mumbai] and western India. From 1858-1947, a subdivision of the British Raj. It was responsible for British relations with the Gulf and Red Sea regions. and the British
Residents at Bushehr and Baghdad. Colonel Kemball^ the Resident
at Baghdad^ who had long experience of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , pointed out
that the case which had occurred was a simple one, and that it would
have been more difficult to deal with had the speculators been European
foreigners holding a pearl fishing concession from some Arab chief ; his
final recommendation was that the G overnment of India should treat
the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. as a mare ciausum, for the purpose of pearl diving,
ao-ainst all persons coming from ports or coasts situated beyond its limits^
and should accordingly by proclamation refuse protection to such persons,
whatever their nationality ; action on these lines would, he considered, be
sufficient to deter Europeans, at least, from interference with the fisheries.
The action of Captain Disbrowe and the views of Colonel Kemball were
generally approved by the Government of Bombay From c. 1668-1858, the East India Company’s administration in the city of Bombay [Mumbai] and western India. From 1858-1947, a subdivision of the British Raj. It was responsible for British relations with the Gulf and Red Sea regions. , but the Resident
in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. was enjoined to observe caution in matters which
affected the rights either of foreigners or of Arabs, and he was ordered to
report on the extent of the pearl banks and the nature of the rules and
customs by which boundaries and rights were governed, as well as on
the manner of settling disputes heretofore, and the best means of preserv
ing the peace without involving the British Government in an in
convenient protectorate. Colonel Pelly, the Resident at Bushehr,
on the ground that no practical advantage was likely to be gained,
whereas the suspicions of the Arabs would probably be aroused and
inconvenient claims by Persia, Turkey and the Wahhabi ruler might be
provoked, deprecated inquiry or any attempt to systematise the rights
and customs of the fisheries; and at the same time he suggested that the
proclamation of a mare clausvm in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. was a serious step,
which might bring the British Government into conflict with European
or American powers, and that a reserved attitude on the question
would be preferable. In the end, no proclamation was made, and the
demand for detailed information regarding the pearl fisheries was
withdrawn by the Bombay Government.
The international position of the pearl banks attracted no further
attention until 1872, when it became known that Mid-hat Pasha An Ottoman title used after the names of certain provincial governors, high-ranking officials and military commanders. , the
Turkish Wali of Baghdad, contemplated the exploitation of certain pearl
tanks in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. by means of an English diver. The diver
reached Baghdad in May 1872, but a personal warning that
British protection would not be extended to him in his operations
apparently had the desired result, for, in the end, the Turkish scheme was
not carried into effect.
In 1873 a British firm, Messrs. Smith and Company, of London,
favoured to obtain a footing as pearl fishers in the Gulf; and in
uetober of that year—-while a request which they had made to the
-oreign 0 fg ce for recognition and assistance was still under consideration
-their representative in the person of Mr. Grant, an officer of the
a J e Indian Navy, made his appearance at Bushehr. Here he had an
Mierview with Colonel Ross, the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , who declined to
Discussions
regarding
British
policy, 1862-
1863.
Mid-hat
Pasha An Ottoman title used after the names of certain provincial governors, high-ranking officials and military commanders. 's
scheme, 1872,
Messrs,
Smith and
Company 's
project,
1873.

About this item

Content

This volume is Volume I, Part II (Historical) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part II contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914, 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (pags v-viii), and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (ix-cxxx). These are also found in Volume I, Part IA of the Gazetteer (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1).

Part II consists of three chapters:

  • 'Chapter X. History of ’Arabistān' (pages 1625-1775);
  • 'Chapter XI. History of the Persian Coast and Islands' (pages 1776-2149);
  • 'Chapter XII. History of Persian Makrān' (pages 2150-2203).

The chapters are followed by nineteen appendices:

Extent and format
1 volume (1165 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part II is arranged into chapters that are sub-divided into numbered periods covering, for example, the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The appendices are sub-divided into lettered subject headings and also contain numbered annexures, as well as charts. Both the chapters and appendices have further subject headings that appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally througout the volume at the bottom of the page which provide further details and references. A 'Detailed Table of Contents' for Part II and the Appendices is on pages cii-cxxx.

Physical characteristics

The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 879, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1503.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2245] (762/1262), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023514763.0x0000a0> [accessed 5 March 2024]

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