Skip to item: of 1,262
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2492] (1009/1262)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 volume (1165 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

2492
been Irft, however, to the discretion of the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the
Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. ; and the sums realised are still withheld from the local
authorities when there is reason to think that their return to the Shaikh
might indirectly render the punishment nugatory.
History of the external slave trade of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and of
British preventive operations, 1852-73.
Commence
ment of
sjstematio
operations,
1852.
Operations
during the
KeBidentship
of Captain
Kembali,
1852-55.
We now pass on to consider the manner in which the agreements
obtained and the enactments passed by the British Government have
been utilised for the suppression of the slave trade in the Persian
Gulf; and in doing so we need not go further back than 1852,
one of the earliest years in which the legal position in the Gulf, in
consequence of the arrangements then recently made with the Turkish
and Persian Governments, was such as to admit of general action^
With the Hrst operations of all, about to be described, though they did
little more than demonstrate the magnitude of the evil, the names of
Captain (afterwards Colonel Sir) A. B. Kembali and of Captain Felix
Jones, Indian Navy, two successive Political Residents at Bushehr, are
honourably associated.
In the summer of 1852 the steam vessel Tigris^ of the Indian
Navy, Lieutenant Tronson, was placed on slave duty in the Gulf with
orders to watch the Batinah coast and other suspected localities; but
her equipment was unsuitable for the duties that she had to perform,
and the results of her cruise were inconsiderable. It was at once realised
by Captain Kembali, the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , that no assistance was to
be expected from natives of the Gulf • and, even at this early stage
of the operations, the Resident suggested that preventive measures
would probably be more efficacious if they were taken on the African
coasts from which the slaves were exported. In 1853, the slave trade
having been shown to prevail in the Gulf to an appalling extent,
Captain Kembali recommended naval surveillance of the Batinah and
East African coasts ; but there was a serious deficiency of ships, and
the Government steamship " Queen, ,, which was made available for
a short time, apparently effected nothing; some slaves were captured,
however, by the H.E.I. Company's Schooner Constance/'' A few
months later, at the beginning of ]854 ; Captain Kemball renewed his
representations and advised that a steamer, with a small sailing vessel
to assist her, should be sent to cruise off the South Arabian coast in the
latitude of Makalla from the 15th of March to the 1st of June; but
again there was difficulty in providing a suitable vessel, and none was sent
until 1855, when the " Queen,^ in the month of July, began to cruise
off the ^Oman coast between Ras-al-Hadd and Masqat, and was relieved
later in the season by the corvette " Falkland/'' The operations of 1855
were absolutely barren of results. From 1852 to 1855 inclusive, the
number of slaves liberated by the British authorities in the Gulf was
78, of whom only 15 were rescued at sea.
l|

About this item

Content

This volume is Volume I, Part II (Historical) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part II contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914, 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (pags v-viii), and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (ix-cxxx). These are also found in Volume I, Part IA of the Gazetteer (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1).

Part II consists of three chapters:

  • 'Chapter X. History of ’Arabistān' (pages 1625-1775);
  • 'Chapter XI. History of the Persian Coast and Islands' (pages 1776-2149);
  • 'Chapter XII. History of Persian Makrān' (pages 2150-2203).

The chapters are followed by nineteen appendices:

Extent and format
1 volume (1165 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part II is arranged into chapters that are sub-divided into numbered periods covering, for example, the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The appendices are sub-divided into lettered subject headings and also contain numbered annexures, as well as charts. Both the chapters and appendices have further subject headings that appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally througout the volume at the bottom of the page which provide further details and references. A 'Detailed Table of Contents' for Part II and the Appendices is on pages cii-cxxx.

Physical characteristics

The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 879, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1503.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2492] (1009/1262), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023514765.0x000007> [accessed 5 March 2024]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023514765.0x000007">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;2492] (1009/1262)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023514765.0x000007">
	<img src="https://iiif.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000149/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_2_1006.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000149/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image