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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol. II. Geographical and Statistical. J G Lorimer. 1908' [‎368] (411/2084)

The record is made up of 1 volume (1952 pages). It was created in 1908. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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868
DASHTI
Kuh-i-Namak is adjoined on its southern side by a range of which the
highest point (3,270 feet) is Kuh-i-Darang Jj)*, not far from Kuh-i.
Namak. This range runs first southwards for 16 miles and then eastwards
for an equal distance : the result is the enclosing between it and the main
range of a triangular valley called Bu Saif which has no open exit
except at its south-eastern corner on the coast between Daiyir and
Kangiin. Kuh-i-Darang is of sandstone and is connected with Kuh-i-
Namak by mounds of sandstone and gypsum intersected by ravines
containing brackish water.
Dashti thus consists of two plains or valleys that both drain south-
eastwards and are separated from one another by the plain or serpen
tine valley of the Mtind river, of which the average direction is at
right angles to theirs.
Coast, —The coast of Dashti has not been thoroughly explored and part
of it is unapproachable by vessels owins: to extensive shoals. Six miles off
the mainland at ai>out 27 miles south-south-east of Khor Ziyarat and
approximately the same distance west of Daiyir is a low islet, 4 a mile
in diameter, called Nakhilu : it appears to be a meeting-place of
several hydrographical features and it marks the point where the direction
of tbe coast changes from south-south-east to full east. From Nakhilu
a grejit shoal, called Kas-al-Mutaf olkJI ^ runs for nearly 20 miles
to the east-south-east with a deep channel inside which is open to the
east but blind at the other end except for a boat passage round the
north side of Naklalu j and between this shoal and the mainland
again is a second thoal with yet another deep channel inside. The
inner channel appears to be called Khor Umm-al-Karam r l, from
the name of a small island at the head ».f it: the outer is called Khan
: both Umm-al-Karam and Khan are excellent havens for
native boats and are used as such by the people of the nearest mainland
villages. On the north side of the Nakhilu boat passage, already
mentioned, begins a narrow strip of sand called Jabrin which
runs north-north-west for 6 miles and then joins, or almost joins, the
mainland. From Nakhilu northwards to Khor Ziyarat the coast is
a mass of swamps and small creeks of which little is known.
Climate, —Theelimate of Dashti is accounted good ; both on the coast
and inland it is cooler in summer than that of the Bushehr Peninsula.
Population, —The population of the district, between the mountains
and the sea, is probably not less than 20,000 eouls,

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Content

This volume is Volume II of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1908) compiled by John Gordon Lorimer. The volume is a geographical dictionary with a series of alphabetically arranged articles relating to the physical and political conditions of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. and its surrounding areas.

Pages i-iv are an 'Introduction' to the volume written by John Gordon Lorimer at Strathmartine, Dundee, on 24 December 1908. Details are given within the introduction concerning the content and arrangement of principal and subordinate articles and explanations of estimates of distance and time and other statistical information.

Lorimer's introduction identifies the principal articles as:

  • '’Omān Sultanate' (pages 1382-1425);
  • '’Omān (Trucial)' [ Trucial Oman A name used by Britain from the nineteenth century to 1971 to refer to the present-day United Arab Emirates. ] (pages 1425-1451);
  • 'Qatar' (pages 1505-1535);
  • 'Bahrain Principality' (pages 233-253);
  • 'Hasa Sanjāq' (pages 657-679);
  • 'Kuwait Principality' (pages 1058-1077);
  • 'Najd' (pages 1313-1351), supplemented by articles on 'Najd (Southern)' (pages 1351-1359), 'Qasīm' (pages 1485-1503) and 'Shammar (Jabal)' (pages 1732-1748);
  • '’Irāq (Turkish)' (pages 759-882);
  • '’Arabistān' (pages 115-151), suppplemented by articles on '’Arabistān (Northern)' (pages 151-157) and '’Arabistān (Southern)' (pages 157-165);
  • 'Persian Coast' (pages 1455-1468);
  • 'Makrān (Coast of Persian)' (pages 1130-1155).

All articles have a similar form. The English and Arabic place or tribe name appears in the right or left margin, followed by the text of the article split into sub-sections and with topographical information arranged in tables. Arabic words are given in the text next to their equivalent transliterated into Latin script, with the transliteration system employed appearing in 'Appendix S' in Volume I, Part II (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, pages 2737-2741).

Topics of information contained within the articles include: boundaries and sub-divisions; physical character and main features (for example, mountains and rivers); climate and seasons; natural products (vegetable, animal and mineral); agriculture and crops; livestock, including transport animals; inhabitants, with reference to racial and tribal distinctions, religious differences, mode of life, character, language, customs, dress and arms, and estimates of populations; trade (internal and external), with notice to currency, weights and measures, shipping, manufactures and industries, and miscellaneous occupations; communications by land and water, with descriptions of routes and estimates of transport; administration and government, especially police, justice, military resources, taxation and finance, and political constitution; and, international position and foreign interests, especially British and their representation in the country. Lorimer refers readers to the Appendices of Volume I, Part II (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, pages 2205-2741) for fuller details concerning: meteorology, health, date cultivation, transport animals and livestock, religions and sects, trade, sailing vessels, fisheries, pearl fisheries, and postal and telegraphic communications.

There are fifty-six folios lacking page numbers that contain illustrations. The images are labelled as follows:

  • 'Wādi Bani Habīb in Jabal Akhdar'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'A Creek near Basrah from the Shatt=al=’Arab'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Bridge of Boats, Baghdād'. Photographer: Major G Arbuthnot;
  • 'The Hanaini well, Bahrain Island'. Photographer: John Calcott Gaskin;
  • 'Ancient Tumuli, Bahrain Island'. Photographer: John Calcott Gaskin;
  • 'Village of Qatārah Baraimi Oasis'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'The ’Ashshār creek in Basrah Town'. Photographer: Mr Albert Charles Wratislaw;
  • 'The British Consulate. Basrah, from the Shatt=al=’Arab. (Consulate building on the right of picture)'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Parade of British and Persian troops at Rīshehr, 1905';
  • 'Part of the town of Būshehr';
  • 'The Sea Front, Būshehr Town';
  • 'The British Political Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , Būshehr';
  • 'Bridge at Buziyeh'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'The Fort [Qasr al-Ḥuṣn] of the Shaikh at Abu Dhabi'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'The Shaikh of Sharjah's Fort at Dhaid, Trucial Oman A name used by Britain from the nineteenth century to 1971 to refer to the present-day United Arab Emirates. '. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Dizfūl Town'. Photographer: Major G Arbuthnot;
  • 'Dohah in Qatar'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'A Canal in the Fallāhiyeh District'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'A Creek at Fāo'. Photographer: Mr W D Cumming;
  • 'Muti at the head of Wādi Halfain'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Near the village of Qārah in the Hasa Oasis'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'The village of Qārah in the Hasa Oasis'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'Desert bewteen the Hasa Oasis and Qatar'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'The Imāmzādeh of Haidar Karār at the place of formation of the Hindiyān River'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'The Hindyān River near Zaidān'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'General View of Hofūf'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'The Na’āthil Quarter, Hofūf'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'Hormuz - View from the old Fort'. Photographer: Raja King Deen Dayal & Sons;
  • 'Crowd at Rās=al-Khaimah'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Rās=al-Khaimah, looking towards Ruūs=al=Jibāl'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Kumzār'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'The foreshore Kuwait, showing boat harbour'. Photographer: John Calcott Gaskin;
  • 'Camel riders of the Shaikh of Kuwait'. Photographer: Raja King Deen Dayal & Sons;
  • 'Lingeh';
  • 'The Tīs Valley in Persian Makrān'. Photographer: Mr R H New;
  • 'Country between the Bīr and Kair Rivers in Persian Makrān'. Photographer: Mr R H New;
  • 'Mouth of the Tīs valley looking seawards'. Photographer: Mr R H New;
  • 'The British Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent. , Manāmah, Bahrain'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'An Arab of the Manāsīr tribe'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'The Cemetery, Maqlab. (From A Photograph in the Possession of H Gabler, Esq, I E T D)';
  • 'Eastern end of Masqat Town, British Consulate on the left, Sultan's palace on the right'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'West end of Masqat Town from Sultan's Palace. & Fort Mīrāni'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Centre and Western end of Masqat Town with part of the Harbour'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'View of Wādi Mi’aidin from Sharaijah'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'River Scene Muhammareh'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Two Views of Muhammareh Town'. Photographer: John Calcott Gaskin;
  • 'Persian Battery at Muhammareh'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'View at Haz’=Dhabi, Trucial Oman A name used by Britain from the nineteenth century to 1971 to refer to the present-day United Arab Emirates. '. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • '’Oqair Port'. Photographer: Herr Hermann Burchardt;
  • 'Salt Rocks on Qishm Island near Namakdān'. Photographer: Raja King Deen Dayal & Sons;
  • 'The "Earl Canning" lying in Elphinstone inlet, Ruus=al=Jibal 1868. [Head of Inlet.] From A Photograph in the Possession of H Gabler, Esq, I E T D)';
  • ' Wadi A seasonal or intermittent watercourse, or the valley in which it flows. Samail near Hisn Samail'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Eastern Face of Jabal=ash=Sham';
  • 'The port of Sur'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'Bilād=as=Sur'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox;
  • 'The Fort of Wakrah, Qatar'. Photographer: Major Percy Zachariah Cox.
Extent and format
1 volume (1952 pages)
Arrangement

Following the title pages and 'Introduction', entries are arranged in alphabetical order from '’Abādilah' to 'Zubair Town'.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1034. It should be noted that f. 192 is followed by f. 192A.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol. II. Geographical and Statistical. J G Lorimer. 1908' [‎368] (411/2084), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/4, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023515713.0x00000c> [accessed 4 March 2024]

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