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Coll 7/14 'Persia and Persian Gulf: suggested Anglo-Persian Arms Traffic Agreement. Persia and the Arms Traffic Convention' [‎402r] (814/1190)

The record is made up of 1 volume (591 folios). It was created in 18 Aug 1926-28 Jun 1933. It was written in English and French. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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4o2
CAPTAIN DANCKWERTS said he did not think this was actually so
as no right of search was implied in the convention. Powers were
^given only to identify vessels, and in cases of suspicion, to take
them to the nearest port of the country whose flag the vessel was
flying and leave them there for the shore authorities to deal with.
MR, WARNER said that at the present moment the Persian Govern
ment had no right to interfere with the shipping of the Arab State
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , which were in special treaty relations with
Kis Majesty's Government. The Foreign Office saw objection to any
procedure which would give Persia excuse, if not authority, for
such action. The special zone provisions, if agreed to by Persia
would give Persian warships the right to ’'inspect” such vessels in
uhe .ersian Gulf. On the other hand, since it appeared that the
Persian Government were very unlikely to accede to any convention
containing the "special zone" provisions of the 1925 Arms Traffic
Convention and Mr* Carr reported.that the general feeling on the
Committee at Geneva was against the maintenance of the special zone
provisions and since the position at the present moment could not
he considered altogether unsatisfactory, the Foreign Office felt
that unless there were strong reasons for pressing for the mainten
ance of the special zone provisions, then it might well be best to
acquiesce in their being dropped.
oAPTAIN DANCKWERTS said that so far as the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was
concerned, the position had been fairly satisfactory for some years.
MR. LAITKWAITS enquired whether, supposing the special zone
Proposal was abandoned, no arms traffic convention came into
e xistence and it was not possible to negotiate a satisfactory
bilateral arms traffic agreement with Persia, the Admiralty consid-
er>e d that the traffic could be Heft effectively under control in the
Arslan Gulf purely by exercising our existing treaty powers and
maintaining our existing practice as regards search of Arab vessels
0n the high seas?

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Content

The volume consists of extensive correspondence, plus minutes and memoranda, relating to the 1925 Convention for the Supervision of the International Trade in Arms and Ammunition and in Implements of War (Arms Traffic Convention), and the subsequent attempts to reproduce certain of its provisions in an international covenant at the Geneva Disarmament Conference of 1932-1933.

The principal correspondents are: the Government of India Foreign and Political Department; the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Political Department; the Admiralty; the Foreign Office; HM Minister at Tehran (R H Hoare); the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and the UK Delegate to the Disarmament Conference (E H Carr). The volume also contains a number of communications received from members of the Persian Government (Muhammad Ali Foroughi [Furūghī], Abdolhossein Teymourtache, and Anoushirvan Khan Sepahbodi).

The material principally concerns negotiations between the Persian [Iranian] and British Governments. The Persian Government wished to have the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and the Gulf of Oman excluded from the list of special maritime zones, and sought British support in achieving this at the Conference. In response to British concerns about the possible impact on their ability to effectively limit the transport of arms and slaves in the region, the Persian Government proposed a bilateral Anglo-Persian treaty.

The following topics are discussed in depth:

The following are particular items of interest:

  • memorandum of the Persian Delegation to the League of Nations, noting their objections to the Arms Traffic Convention, ff 517-522;
  • communication from HM Legation to Tehran, enclosing details of an interview with the Persian Minister for Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Court (Foroughi and Teymourtache), ff 492-500;
  • minutes of the Interdepartmental Cabinet Committee on the International Disarmament Conference, ff 394-420;
  • details of a meeting between the Foreign Office and the Persian Minister to Switzerland (Sepahbodi), ff 185-192;
  • Persian Government aide-mémoire on the progress of the negotiations, ff 121-124.

The volume includes a divider which gives a list of correspondence references contained in the volume by year. This is placed at the end of the correspondence (folio 1).

Extent and format
1 volume (591 folios)
Arrangement

The papers are arranged in rough chronological order from the rear to the front of the volume

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at the first folio with 1 and terminates at the last folio with 587; these numbers are written in pencil, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. The foliation sequence does not include the front and back covers, nor does it include the two leading and ending flyleaves. A previous foliation sequence has been superseded and therefore crossed out.

Written in
English and French in Latin script
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Coll 7/14 'Persia and Persian Gulf: suggested Anglo-Persian Arms Traffic Agreement. Persia and the Arms Traffic Convention' [‎402r] (814/1190), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/12/2182, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100062983817.0x00000f> [accessed 23 February 2020]

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