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'Historical Summary of Events in Territories of the Ottoman Empire, Persia and Arabia affecting the British Position in the Persian Gulf, 1907-1928' [‎16v] (39/188)

The record is made up of 1 volume (90 folios). It was created in 1928. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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30
rJpn i in 9^1°\i e 1 Britlsl1 Hi g h Commissioner there wrote, on the
i* 1 ? iiV u u- } W1 a force of tllls supported by a horde of
hard-fighti^ ahabi zealots, Ibn Saud might sweep through Hejaz and Arabia " to
the confusion of our Arab and Moslem policies." In the end the idea of greatly
increasing Ibn Saud s armaments was rejected by His Majesty's Government.
. . i ni o U ?S eCeSSa ^ ^detail the relations of the King and the Emir during the
yeais - , nor the efiorts made by His Majesty's Government to maintain peace
between their Arab allies. Still less to look at the differences of opinion that
eve ope oetween the British authorities in Cairo and Bagdad in regard to policy
towards the King and Ibn Saud. These matters scarcely pertain to the Persian
• ^r/io e ' 1 €re ej notice only the milestones of Ibn Saud's progress
m 1 j 18 and 1919 towards the domination of Arabia.
It may be remarked that in 1917 and 1918 his pressure on the King progressively
increased as the northward advance of the British army in Palestine, accompanied
by trie ohereenan iorce under the Emir Feisal. improved the prospect of the Kind's
supremacy being established in Syria. ^
The policy Ibn Saud followed on the eastern borders of Hejaz caused in 1918
the^ secession of whole districts from their allegiance to the King. Hussein
endeavoured to reassert his authority by arms, but failed in several minor conflicts
with the Akhwan, who were assisted by their brethren from Nejd. So far the
struggle a as local, and apparently without the approval or visible support of
I n baud. He informed His Majesty s Government, however, that he was under
the greatest pressure to intervene, and would be unable to resist it indefinitely.
In 191b be sent an expedition against Hail, but it achieved nothinD , ■ of
importance. &
In Mav 1919 when the Emir Feisal was established in possession of Damascus,
matters came lo a head at Taraba, on the eastern border of Hejaz. A considerable
armv that King Hussein had collected there under his son Abdullah to re-establish
the Royal authority was attacked by the Akhwan at night and completely destroyed.
-je efforts of His Majesty's Government, an open rupture between Ibn Saud and
the King was averted at this time, but the Wahabi Emir pledged his people that in
the event of further action by Hussein he would call out the Akhwan and take the
field in person.
For Ibn Saud the period of the World War may be said to have ended in Mav
1919 with the affair of Taraba.
PART III.—POST-WAR PERIOD (1918-28).
Chapter (7).—Iraq (1918-28).
I he armistice of Mudros (31st October, 1918) found a British army in occupation
oi Mesopotamia from the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. to within a few miles of Mosul. That citv
itself was occupied on the 8th November.
On the 7th November, 1918, appeared the Anglo-French declaration, which
stated definitely that the purpose of British and Irench policy in Mesopotamia and
Syria was to establish in the liberated countries national Governments and Adminis-
ti at ions which should derive their authority from the free choice of the indigenous
populations. The declaration stated further, that it was the purpose of the two
Powers to recognise these Governments as soon as they had been actually established.
I he declaration was taken at its face value—and much more—throughout the
liberated tt! i itoiies, and provided, and has continued to piovide, a standard for
fulfilment, both as to degree and time, probably beyond the intentions of the
declaratory Governments.
W ith the adoption of the principle of mandates by the Peace Conference at Paris
rt w as known that the mandate for Mesopotamia would be given to Great Britain.
But the conference delayed long in dealing with the subject.
Biitish piestige, which hat! stood so high in Mesopotamia at the time of the
armistice, began to decline in 1919. The system of administration adopted was
becoming progressively unpopular as too complicated and costly for the country.
I he .ost of living had increased, a fact attributed to the British, and the
dissatisfaction arising from these matters and from fears for the future was
seized upon and fanned by malcontents and agitators—Bagdadis, Turks and Syrians.
Meanwhile, the British troops were being rapidly evacuated, and the administrative
services were losing their trained and experienced officials.

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Content

The volume is entitled Summary of Events in Territories of the Ottoman Empire, Persia and Arabia affecting the British Position in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , 1907-1928 (printed by the Committee of Imperial Defence, October 1928).

Includes sections on The Ottoman Empire, Persia, Arabia (Nejd [Najd]), Mohammerah [Khorramshahr], Muscat, and Bahrein [Bahrain].

Extent and format
1 volume (90 folios)
Arrangement

There is a table of contents at the front of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at 1 on the front cover and terminates at 90 on the back cover. These numbers are written in pencil, are enclosed in a circle, and appear in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. Foliation anomalies: ff. 1, 1A; ff. 86, 86A. Two folios, f. 3 and f. 4 have been reattached in the wrong order, so that f. 4 precedes f. 3. The following map folios need to be folded out to be examined: f. 87, f. 88.

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English in Latin script
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'Historical Summary of Events in Territories of the Ottoman Empire, Persia and Arabia affecting the British Position in the Persian Gulf, 1907-1928' [‎16v] (39/188), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/730, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100022744604.0x000028> [accessed 6 December 2019]

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