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'Administration Report of the Persian Gulf for the Year 1937' [‎8r] (15/72)

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The record is made up of 1 file (34 folios). It was created in 1938. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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5
SECTION 7.
MANUMISSION.
During 1937, the following number of slaves was manumitted:—
Bahrain Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent.
Muscat Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent.
Sharjah Agency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, headed by an agent.
23
30
22
A. C. GALLOWAY,
Secretary to the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. ,
SECTION 8.
TRADE AND TRADE FACILITIES.
1. General conditions. —Previous reports have emphasized the effect of
the Government's policy of economic centralisation on the trade position in
Bushire. Bushire has, in the past two years, ceased to exist as an indepen
dent trading centre of any importanoe, and no longer offers openinjrs for
foreign trade, as local demand, except for staple goods such as, sugar ai d piece-
goods, which are already the object of monopoly, is insufficient to justify
trading for the local market. Deprived of this form of activity, the town has
come to depend solely to the use made of the port, and such merchants as
remain confine themselves to acting as forwarding agents for principals in the
industrial and trading centres of the interior. The economy of the town
reflects the changed conditions in every sphere. Bazaar activity is restricted
to a minimum to meet the demands of local consumers ; the monopoly
branches on the other hand, are active. The transport companies, four of
which now exist in the ^own, have derived considerable activity from the
demands of the forwarding agents; two new garages opened in 1937.
Employment in commercial undertakings tends to decline, the population
becoming increasingly dependent on the official departments, Customs,
Malieh, municipality, etc.
In 1937 two branches of monopoly companies were operating in Bushire,
both with capital subscribed locally, both under head office in Tehran. The
sugar monopoly, which in 1938 is to include the monopoly of tea, earned and
naid a dividend of 25 per cent, compared with 22 per cent, net dividend in
1936-37 ; the piece-goods monopoly after an initial year in which no dividend
was distributed, this year paid 15 per cent, on capital.
Such modification complete the adaptation of Bushire to the system under
which the individual as a commercial or industrial unit tends to be superseded
by some form of communal activity. The few concessions made during the
year to the individual, have had little effect in encouraging new trade ; the
response to the placing of various items of export on a free list (category III)
entailing the right to retain the foreign exchange proceeds of export, has been
disappointing, not so much because merchants are slow or unwilling to trade
under these conditions, as because it is increasingly difficult to find exportable
goods for which there is sufficient demand abroad to render exportation profit
able.
The activity of the port presents a contrast to the inactivity of the town-
From a peak in the winter 1936-37, Bushire foreign trade has continued active,
though receding from the peak level, and landing and customs facilities have
improved. In the early part of the year, congestion in the customs was a
source of real difficulty ; ships had in some cases to overcarry cargo for lack
of space in the wharves and warehouses. The inability of the Exchange Com
mission to provide the necessary exchange was responsible for a complete
cessation of customs clearances in April and June. In the last three months
of the year, however, greater regularity on the part of the Commission (even
though hand in hand with delay) has combined with internal organization in
the Customs to remedy the position. The appointment of a new Provincial
53(c) ExAffairsDept.

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Content

The file consists of Administration Report of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. for the Year 1937 (New Delhi: Government of India Press, 1938).

The Report, prepared by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , summarises important information relating to the Gulf and notable events in the Gulf during 1937. The Report contains a review by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , and separate sections on each of the agencies, consulates, and other areas that made up the Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. . The information provided includes lists of personnel, movements of British officials and foreigners, local administration, military and naval matters, aviation, the political situation, trade and commerce, medical reports, meteorological reports, and related information.

Extent and format
1 file (34 folios)
Arrangement

There is a list of contents at the front of the Report, on folio 3.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation system in use commences at 1 on the front cover, and continues through to 36 on the back cover. The sequence is written in pencil, enclosed in a circle, and appears in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio.

Written in
English in Latin script
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'Administration Report of the Persian Gulf for the Year 1937' [‎8r] (15/72), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/717, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023191566.0x000010> [accessed 24 April 2024]

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