Skip to item: of 224
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'File 9/4 Bahrain Reforms. Introduction of Reforms in Bahrain' [‎18v] (53/224)

This item is part of

The record is made up of 1 volume (98 folios). It was created in 30 Dec 1921-27 Jul 1924. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

8
With regard to the actual cases mentioned in these articles, I would ohsem
that three of^these are mentioned in nearly all the articles about Bahrein ami
are three in which Haji Abdul Nabi has specially interested himself.
The case of Mulla Bastaki referred to in the 6rst extract has already l?een
reported ; it is true that the man di^d but of pneumonia some days after fce
left the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. lockup during which he had worked as usual as a coolie.
Kerbalai Asad was accused of 'Dishonest mi^appropriat'on oE properly
possessed by deceased person at the time < f his death'. He pleaded not guilty
butadmitted having disposed of the whole of the property of deceased, though
he was unable to produce any will appointing him executor or an order from
any Court; and nothing to show what he had don- with the property. He was
found guilty by the Shara Court, and sentenced to 3 months imprisonment.
Mulla Baranai Kazeruni was accused of ' forgery ' and pleaded guilty. He
was sentenced to a fine of Bs. 30 and was released after having bedn detained
in prison for 3^ days in all. His forgery was a very palpable and senseless one
and he probably got off so lightly on this account.
The case of Sheikh H-^fiz Misri* is well known to'the Government of India
and has formed subiect of correspondence ; he is an Egyptian journalist of
extreme views who was knocking about the Gu f and was not allowed to land
a second time at Bahrein at the request of the Sheikh.
Jasim Cherawi was one of the Secretaries of the Sheikh "who was always
interfering and on one occasion having gone too far h3 was made, with the
approval of the Sheikh to give an undertaking to behave and jefrain from
intrigue or be liable to deportation. Having broken this he was deported. x
Tins ease was reported also reported to the Government of India.
It is a curious thing that Haji Abdul Kabi continues to reside and carry on
business in Bahrein, as he apparently finds the conditions of 1 fe so tryicg there.
I beg tp suggest that he might be repatriated to his own country. In 1910 His
Majesty's Minister, Tehran, informed this office (in his telegram No. 163t, dated
17th July 1910) that His Majesty's Government had agreed to the deportation
of Haji Abdul Nabi for carrying on exactly ti e same intrigues as he
is doing now. It is unfortunate that he was given time to wind up his
affairs before being deported, and in the end was not sent away. During the
war he lay very low, as he doubtless knew that, if he had given trouble then,
he would have been deported or otherwise punished at once. Since the non-
ratification of the Anglo-Persian Agreement and the subsequent wave of
anti-British feeling in Persia, he has resumed his intrigues with renewed
energy. Until recently he confined himself to calumniating the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , but
recently he has started attacking the Sheikh and his family, who are much
annoyed. If the Sheikh presses for the deportation of Haji Abdul Nabi, I
beg to enquire whether I can authorize the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. to carry it out
"at the request of the Ruler" or, as Haji Abdul Nabi is a foreigner under
British protection, to inform the Sheikh that on account of his misbehaviour
our protection is withdrawn from Haji Abdul Nabi and allow him to deport
the man himself. Of the above two courses I should prefer the first, as the
latter might be misinterpreted as a relaxation of our protection of foreigners.
It is of course possible that Haji Abul Nabi would continue his agitation
in Persia, but in this case he would not be in such a good position to carry it
on as he is now.
A copy of this letter is being sent to His Majesty's Minister, Tehran, His
Majesty s Consul, Shiraz, and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Bahrain.
fFile No. 3E8«Ext.
fPro. Ko. 16 in S. E. August 19 0, Nos. 12-17.

About this item

Content

The volume contains printed copies of Government of India confidential correspondence, relating to the Bahrain reforms. The majority of the letters contained in volume are printed copies of correspondence originally sent to the Government of India either by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. (Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Trevor or Acting Resident Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart Knox), or the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Bahrain (Major Clive Daly). Much of the correspondence featured in the volume can be found in the original (or as office copies) in a number of files in the two Bahrain Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. subsubseries ‘File 9 Bahrain Reforms’ (IOR/R/15/2/127-138) and ‘File 8 Miscellaneous’ (IOR/R/15/2/121-126), and the Bushire Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. subsubseries ‘File 19 Bahrain’ (IOR/R/15/1/314-77).

The printed correspondence contained in the volume covers a range of subjects:

  • Events leading up to the programme of reforms carried out in Bahrain: allegations of the oppression of Bahraini subjects by members of the Āl Khalīfah family, violence, the deteriorating economic situation;
  • The reforms proposed and implemented by British officials: replacement of Shaikh ‘Īsá by Shaikh Ḥamad as defacto ruler, economic reforms, judicial reforms, pearl diving industry reforms, customs house reforms;
  • Specific incidents of violence involving Sunnis and Shias, or Najdis and Persians.

Some of the papers in the volume are accompanied by duplicate copies:

  • Folios 61-64 are duplicates of folios 57-60;
  • Folios 68-69 are duplicates of folios 66-67;
  • Folios 81-84 are duplicates of folios 77-80.
Extent and format
1 volume (98 folios)
Arrangement

The volume's contents are arranged in approximate chronological order, starting with the earliest items at the front and finishing with the latest items at the end.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The volume is foliated from the front cover to the inside back cover, using uncircled pencil numbers in the top-right corner of each recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. . Most of the items in the volume are printed items that have their own internal pagination systems, using printed numbers in the top-right corners of recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. pages and the top-left corners of verso The back of a paper sheet or leaf. pages, or centred at the top of both verso The back of a paper sheet or leaf. and recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. pages. The following foliation anomalies occur: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 1f.

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'File 9/4 Bahrain Reforms. Introduction of Reforms in Bahrain' [‎18v] (53/224), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/2/131, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023403812.0x000036> [accessed 22 January 2020]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023403812.0x000036">'File 9/4 Bahrain Reforms. Introduction of Reforms in Bahrain' [&lrm;18v] (53/224)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023403812.0x000036">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x000362/IOR_R_15_2_131_0053.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x000362/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image