Skip to item: of 222
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Historical Summary of Events in the Persian Gulf Shaikhdoms and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman, 1928-1953' [‎8r] (20/222)

The record is made up of 1 volume (107 folios). It was created in c 1953. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. as Chairman.C 3 ) Its functions were to plan for {a) all matters
affecting the internal security of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. area whether in normal times or
in a general emergency and {b) all those measures which in a general war
emergency would primarily be the responsibility of the civil power.( 14 ) In 1952 a
Military Adviser was appointed to the staff of the Political Residents") He was
subsequently given an independent command (chapter 2, paragraph 117).
8. Under an arrangement made soon after the First World War, which is
known as the Welby Agreement, expenditure in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was to be divided
equally between His Majesty's Government and the Government of India except
with regard to Bahrain and Muscat, which were to be supported by the Government
of India. The latter sought a revision of this arrangement in 1937 in connection
with the contemplated transfer of the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. but their proposals do not appear
to have been accepted.( 16 ) One result of the arrangement is that when His Majesty's
Government assumed control of the Gulf posts in 1947 the Bahrain Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. and
Muscat Consulate buildings and half the Kuwait Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. building were the
property of the Government of India. The Bahrain Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. building has since
collapsed and it is proposed to demolish it. No final settlement has yet been
reached with the Governments of India and Pakistan regarding these and other
assets which His Majesty's Government took over when the control of the Gulf
ports was transferred.( 17 ) It was at one time feared that the Government of India
might claim the right to occupy the buildings, especially the Muscat Consulate,
but no such claim has yet been made.
II.—General Policy with regard to the Shaikhdoms
9. In 1939 Sir Trenchard Fowle, when he had been Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. for
nearly seven years, wrote as follows; " Our ' rule' over the Arab States of the
Gulf rests on the goodwill of the Rulers and their peoples This goodwill
depends on three main factors. First—the fact that as far as possible we
let the Rulers and their people, under our guidance and advice, manage
their own affairs in their own way. Second—the fact that in our various
negotiations with the Rulers, in which of course their peoples are interested, on
the subject of oil, air facilities and so forth, we give them a patient hearing and
a square deal. Third—and most important—the Rulers and their peoples realise
that it is only His Majesty's Government who protect them from absorption by
their stronger neighbours."( 18 )
10. In 1948 His Majesty's Government, after taking over full responsibility
of the Gulf States, had to decide whether—
{a) to continue the policy of not intervening except when compelled, or
{b) to introduce a policy of more direct administration approaching the
colonial model, or
(c) without introducing colonial methods to intensify their efforts to promote
good administration, social progress, and economic development
through the existing Rulers and administrative machinery, largely by
means of British advisers and technicians in the service of the Rulers.
They chose the last course.( 19 )
11. In 1951 His Majesty's Government expressed the following views on the
policy to be followed in dealing with the Shaikhdoms: —
(i) The practical possibility of achieving any form of general political
federation of the Shaikhdoms (as opposed to a local federation of the
Trucial States) is remote. The Rulers should, however, be encouraged
to consult together on matters of regional concern such as education
and health.
( 13 ) P.R. toF.O. 1094/8Gof June 9 5 1951 (EA 1195/4/Gof 1951).
( 14 ) P.R. to F.O. 1094/61 G of November 28, 1951 (EA 1195/10/G of 1951).
( 15 ) P.R. to F.O. 1094(3)/6/92 G of August 22, 1952 (EA 1193/18/G of 1952).
( 16 ) I.O. to F.O. P.Z. 7846/37 of March 16, 1938 (E 1522/461/34 of 1938).
( 17 ) (XC 01/85/25/52 of 1952.)
( 18 ) P.R. to F.O. 113 of July 19, 1948 (E 10151/605/G of 1948).
( 19 ) F.O. to P.R. E 8863/605/G of July 2, 1948.

About this item

Content

The document provides historical information on the region during the period in question and, following a section on general matters, has separate sections on Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, the Trucial States, and Muscat

Extent and format
1 volume (107 folios)
Arrangement

There is a table of contents at the front of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at 1 on the front cover and terminates at 109 on the back cover. These numbers are written in pencil, are enclosed in a circle, and appear in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. The foliation sequence continues into the separate volume of appendices and genealogical tables - IOR/R/15/1/731(2).

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Historical Summary of Events in the Persian Gulf Shaikhdoms and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman, 1928-1953' [‎8r] (20/222), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/731(1), in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023415995.0x000015> [accessed 20 February 2020]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023415995.0x000015">'Historical Summary of Events in the Persian Gulf Shaikhdoms and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman, 1928-1953' [&lrm;8r] (20/222)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023415995.0x000015">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002c1/IOR_R_15_1_731(1)_0020.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002c1/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image