Skip to item: of 222
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Historical Summary of Events in the Persian Gulf Shaikhdoms and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman, 1928-1953' [‎80v] (165/222)

The record is made up of 1 volume (107 folios). It was created in c 1953. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

148
*
the same day he was presented to the first meeting of the Trucial States Council
and his recognition was announced to it. In accepting the a ove con i ions e
had asked for an assurance that so far as an oil concession was concerne e would
be permitted to address any company whatsoever, and this assui ance was given him.
Soon after his recognition he visited Saudi Arabia in order to interest the Aiabian
American Oil Company in his territory but failed in his object. He also paid his
respects to Ibn Saud, who appears to have shown him little favour He subsequently
endeavoured to persuade Petroleum Development Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. Limited
to accept a concession, but they only agreed to take an exploration permit.
Muhammad is active and intelligent and exercises lull control over his tribesmen.
Though illiterate he has much knowledge of Arab history and genealogies. He is
related by marriage to the Ruler of Ajman and on bad terms with the Ruler of
Sharjah against whom he is constantly intriguing.
40. Since the absorption of Kalba by Sharjah, Fujairah shares with this State
the tract bordering on the Gulf of Oman known as the Shamailiyah. In 1950 the
Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. reported as follows: —
" The area under the control of Shaikh Muhammad comprises Fujairah
town and the surrounding area, including the mountains and Wadis to the
west of it of which the most important are Wadi Ham and Wadi Najdiyana,
the coastal strip extending from Kalba to Khor Fakkan, including the villages
of Ghuraifah, Mirbah and Gidfah, and the coastal strip extending from Bidyah
up to and including Diba-Ghurfah and the steppe and mountains to the west
of it. Towards Ras al Khaimah Fujairah territory extends to Habbab,
about two miles south of Khatt.'T 1 )
This description is a very rough one and it is possible that some of the territory
mentioned may be claimed by other Rulers. None of the boundaries of the State
with Sharjah, Ras al Khaimah and Muscat have yet been defined.
III.—The Trucial States Council
41. In 1950 the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , after remarking that he did not consider
that a formal federation of the Trucial States would be possible for many years
to come, recommended the formation of a Council of Rulers which would meet
roughly every three months for the discussion of matters of common interest under
the chairmanship of the Political Officer, Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. .( i5 ) The Foreign Office
accepted this recommendation and, while agreeing that the Political Officer should
prepare the agenda for the meetings of the Council and play a leading part in the
proceedings for the time being, expressed a hope that he would hand over his
functions to the Rulers themselves in due course. They also instructed the Political
Resident to keep the possibility of the formal federation of the States in mind and
to report in due course, after the results of the initial steps had been seen, what
likelihood there was of achieving it.( 16 )
42. Two meetings of the Council were held in 1952 and two in 1953. A
variety of matters was discussed, including domestic slavery, development schemes,
travel documents, nationality laws, anti-locust measures and the re-incorporation
of Kalba with Sharjah. The concurrence of the Rulers was obtained in some
useful measures such as the prohibition of the sale of salves and the issue of traffic
regulations but with the exception of Shaikh Saqr of Sharjah none of them took
any really active part in the discussions or showed any initiative. It will be difficult
to make any progress towards federation until funds can be obtained for the
setting up of a central administrative office. Meanwhile the Ruler of Abu Dhabi
has promised to contribute 4 per cent, of his revenue from any oil found in his
territories to the Trucial Council for the benefit of the Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. as a whole
and the Council has accepted responsibility for the administration of this fund if
it materialises.
( ,4 ) P.R. to F.O. Despatch 39 of May 6, 1950 (EA 1057/2 of 1951).
( 15 ) P.R. to F.O. Despatch 83 of November 25, 1950 (EA 1057/12 of 1950)
( ,6 ) F.O. to P.R. Despatch 47 (EA 1017/3) of April 2, 1951.

About this item

Content

The document provides historical information on the region during the period in question and, following a section on general matters, has separate sections on Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, the Trucial States, and Muscat

Extent and format
1 volume (107 folios)
Arrangement

There is a table of contents at the front of the volume.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: the foliation sequence commences at 1 on the front cover and terminates at 109 on the back cover. These numbers are written in pencil, are enclosed in a circle, and appear in the top right hand corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. page of each folio. The foliation sequence continues into the separate volume of appendices and genealogical tables - IOR/R/15/1/731(2).

Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Historical Summary of Events in the Persian Gulf Shaikhdoms and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman, 1928-1953' [‎80v] (165/222), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/R/15/1/731(1), in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023415995.0x0000a6> [accessed 14 November 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023415995.0x0000a6">'Historical Summary of Events in the Persian Gulf Shaikhdoms and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman, 1928-1953' [&lrm;80v] (165/222)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023415995.0x0000a6">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002c1/IOR_R_15_1_731(1)_0165.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000193.0x0002c1/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image