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'British relations with Turkey in the Persian Gulf. Memorandum on Lieutenant-Colonel Cox's telegram reports in Government of India's telegram of 1 December 1910.' [‎4v] (8/10)

The record is made up of 5 folios. It was created in 7 Dec 1910. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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8
doubtful whether even the modified proposals of the Government of India
could be squared with the status qvo. As a compromise the Government of
India proposed the revival of an agreement of 186S made with a former
Sheikh, but the Foreign Office (18th February 1905), thought that this would
be ineffective, and the matter was reserved for consideration by the Defence
Committee along with the whole question of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . It is not
known whether it was so considered, and it has not been heard of since,
until Sir G. Lowther's Despatch of 22nd August, from which quotation has
already been made, and the Foreign Office letter of 4th October, in which the
views of the India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. were asked for.
We have in the present telegram the views of Lieutenant-Colonel Cox
and the Government of India. They are as follows :—
(Colonel Cox):—
"I consider that it would he useless now to make treaty with Bin Thani,
unless w are prepared to do so openly, and to bring about elimination
of Turkish influence of Katr, as suggested in second item above.
Without such simultaneous action existence of treaty would only be
source of danger to the Thani family from the present Turkish regime,
and they would themselves fight shy of it.
(Government of India):—
■" We concur with Cox that no advantage would accrue from treaties with
Katr Chiefs, and further that Chiefs would probably not now agree to
enter into treaties, unless the Turks can be induced to confine
themselves to their recognised possessions at Katif and Ujair."
It will be observed that in 1904, when the local situation was ripe,
Constantinople was not ready ; and that now, when Constantinople is ready,
the local situation is not ripe. Sir G. Lowther in his despatch of 22nd iVugust
savs that " the time may not be far distant when, as advocated by Lord
" Lansdowne in February 1905, a comprehensive, as opposed to piecemeal,
" treatment of outstanding questions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . . . may
" become imperative." The nearest approach that has been made to
anything comprehensive was Sir E. Grey's Despatch of 17th October, the
fate of which has been described. If the settlement is to be friendly there
must be some give and take. As to this Colonel Cox's view is:—
" Whether achievement of above ends is possible by means of comprehensive
reciprocal compromise or whether coercive measures wdl be necessany,
is a question beyond my purview, but I beg to say that I can conceive
no quid pro quo which we could offer Porte in this sphere in exchange
for withdrawal of her pretensions. It could perhaps be found in some
other sphere."
This will presumably be accepted. The only points of contact that we
have with Turkey in the neighbourhood of the Gulf are things that both of
us want and neither can afford to part with.
" Should coercive measures (Colonel Cox says) be necessary, we can never
expect the recurrence of such a. favourable junction locally as exists at
present. The numerical strength of mUitary posts in question has just
been reduced to a minimum under Nazim Pasha s scheme for concen
trating troops at Bagdad; while we have strong squadron in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. in connection with Arms Tra ffic, which would, make naval
demonstration simple matter."
The Foreign Office, as has been mentioned above, have already contem
plated resort to force in the case of the mudirates in Katr, with the result—
not uncommon in such cases—that it was proposed that India should perform
the task. If troops are to be employed, it is perhaps natural that they should
be Indian troops. But their employment would probably come within the
scope of 21 & 22 Vict. c. 106, s. 55: "Except for preventing or repelling
" actual invasion of Her Majesty's Indian possessions, or under other sudden
" and urgent necessity, the revenues of India shall not, without the consent
" of both Houses of Parliament, be applicable to defray the expenses of any
" military operation carried on beyond the external frontiers of such
" possessions by Her Majesty's forces charged upon such revenues." It is

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Content

This memorandum concerns British relations with Turkey in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and was written by Frederic Arthur Hirtzel in December 1910. The immediate question it addresses is 'the desirability of concluding a treaty with a Sheikh or Sheikhs of the El Katr [Qatar] peninsula as a bulwark against Turkish aggression' and comments on a telegram by Percy Zachariah Cox. It is divided into three parts; the first part assesses the general Anglo-Turkish situation in the Gulf and examines anti-British and pro-German developments as Constantinople.

The second part concurs that the publication of the secret agreement with Shaikh Mubarak bin Sabah of Koweit [Kuwait] is necessary to clarify matters and lists settlements claimed by the Shaikh of Koweit. The third part argues that having achieved that they should make treaties on the lines of Trucial Coast The historic term used by the British to refer to the Gulf coast of Trucial Oman, now called United Arab Emirates. agreements with 'Bin Thani' [Shaikh Jāsim bin Muḥammad Āl Thānī]. The memorandum discusses how such an agreement would be justifiable because by excluding foreign powers it would maintain the status quo.

The memorandum concludes that it was desirable to conclude treaties with the Qatar tribes and that this would require giving them a guarantee against Turkish aggression.

Extent and format
5 folios
Arrangement

The memorandum is arranged in three sections with an introduction and conclusion.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence commences at the first folio, and terminates at the last folio; these numbers are written in pencil, are circled, and are located in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. side of each folio. Pagination: An original printed pagination sequence is also present in the booklet.

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English in Latin script
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'British relations with Turkey in the Persian Gulf. Memorandum on Lieutenant-Colonel Cox's telegram reports in Government of India's telegram of 1 December 1910.' [‎4v] (8/10), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/18/B181, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023493123.0x000009> [accessed 23 May 2019]

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