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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎1936] (453/1262)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (1165 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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1936
Scheme of
the Bombay
Government
or establish
ing a British
station in a i
central posi
tion in the
Gulf, 1819-
were wrongful and had been instigated by Mr. Bruce^ though he was
not himself present on either occasion. The gravamen of the complaint;
however^ evidently lay in the article relating to Bahrain.
The opinion of the Government of India in the matter, when it
eventually came before them, was that Mr. Bruce's conduct had been
perfectly correct throughout^ and that his removal from Bushehr on
the complaint of the Persian Government could only be regarded as an
unworthy compliance with a most unreasonable requisition; but they
remarked that his transfer elsewhere^ if it were desired for other reasons
or would be agreeable to Mr. Bruce himself^ should not be treated
as barred by the consideration mentioned. In 1822 the Government of
Bombay directed payment of compensation to the owners of the Lingeh
and Charak boats mentioned in this paragraph.
Even before the sailing of the expedition of 1819 from India^ the
Government of Bombay From c. 1668-1858, the East India Company’s administration in the city of Bombay [Mumbai] and western India. From 1858-1947, a subdivision of the British Raj. It was responsible for British relations with the Gulf and Red Sea regions. had in view the establishment^ subsequently
to the operations against Ras-al-Khaimah^ of a British naval and
military base in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , in a situation more central and
commanding than either Bushehr or Basrah. Such a station, it was
thought, would facilitate the repression of piracy in the future; and
Sir W. G # Keir was instructed to recommend a suitable spot, after
special consideration of the facilities afforded by Qishm and Hanjam,
and to report whether the British Political Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. - 7 in the Persian
Gulf might not with advantage be transferred from Bushehr to the
place selected. The experience obtained in the course of the expedition
corroborated the impression of the Bombay Government as to the
advantages of an island base in the vicinity of the piratical ports ; and
it seems to have been the unanimous opinion of all the political; naval
and military officers employed in the Gulf that without some such
station the complete eradication of piracy would be impossible. Sir
W. G. Keir, however, while he approved of the scheme generally;
deprecated the immediate removal of the British Residency An office of the East India Company and, later, of the British Raj, established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. fro 131
Bushehr, and suggested that it should be allowed to remain where it
was until trade, in consequence of the creation of the new settlement, bad
fallen naturally into other channels.
At the request of the Government of Bombay From c. 1668-1858, the East India Company’s administration in the city of Bombay [Mumbai] and western India. From 1858-1947, a subdivision of the British Raj. It was responsible for British relations with the Gulf and Red Sea regions. the project for a
British naval and military base was unfolded to the Shah by Sir
Willock, the British Charge d^Affaires at Tehran; but it was evidently
most unpalatable to His Persian Majesty, who refused a personal inter
view on the subject and caused his reply to be communicated to the
British representative by his ministers. His answer was, in effect, that

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Content

This volume is Volume I, Part II (Historical) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part II contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914, 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (pags v-viii), and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (ix-cxxx). These are also found in Volume I, Part IA of the Gazetteer (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1).

Part II consists of three chapters:

  • 'Chapter X. History of ’Arabistān' (pages 1625-1775);
  • 'Chapter XI. History of the Persian Coast and Islands' (pages 1776-2149);
  • 'Chapter XII. History of Persian Makrān' (pages 2150-2203).

The chapters are followed by nineteen appendices:

Extent and format
1 volume (1165 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part II is arranged into chapters that are sub-divided into numbered periods covering, for example, the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The appendices are sub-divided into lettered subject headings and also contain numbered annexures, as well as charts. Both the chapters and appendices have further subject headings that appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally througout the volume at the bottom of the page which provide further details and references. A 'Detailed Table of Contents' for Part II and the Appendices is on pages cii-cxxx.

Physical characteristics

The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 879, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1503.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎1936] (453/1262), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023514762.0x000033> [accessed 21 June 2024]

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