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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2366] (883/1262)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (1165 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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2366
of the Sardar Leader of a tribe or a polity; also refers to a military rank or title given to a commander of an army or division. -i-Mukarram, were almost entirely managed by tlie Mujtaliids.
Between 1905 and 1907 the influence of the family of Shaikh Muhammad
'Ali was completely destroyed by a combination between the Sardar Leader of a tribe or a polity; also refers to a military rank or title given to a commander of an army or division. -i-
Mukarram and the family of Saiyid 'Abdus Samad; but it is expected
that it will revive in course of time.
The Mujta- Dizful, the largest town of Northern ''Arabistan, is also the resi-
dence of some Mujtabids, but they are less influential than those of
D Shushtar. The principal Mujtahid family in 1905 was one headed
by Agha Shaikh Muhammad Hasan, Hujjat-ul-Islam, who was then
70 vears of age and was regarded as the chief Mujtahid ; he had a
son Agha Shaikh Muhammad Baqir, then aged 45, and a grandson,
Sadr-ud-Dm, aged 17, a son of the last. The next Mujtahid family
in importance was that of Shaikh Muhammad Hasan, who was dis
tinguished by the title of Ansar ^ and was himself 70 years ot
age; he had a son Agha Shaikh^ Muhammad, aged 46. A third
family at this time was that of Agha Shaikh Muhammed Hiza, a
nephew of the chief Mujtahid, who had a son, 18years 0 * a g e > ^ al f. e
Shaikh Muhammad. Shaikh Muhammad Hasan, the chief Mujtahid,
was generally liked and respected and was uniformly pleasant and po i e
in his dealings with the British Vice-Consul in Arabistan. n
the influence of the Ansar family was on the wane. Only e .
family were possessed of private wealth, and the other two su sis e
chiefly on the offerings of the devout. The Mujtahids are m iz u
the dispensers of public charity and collect for that purpose^
Zakat or alms prescribed in the Quran; most of them, however, aving
private property, are supposed to act upon a familiar prover o
detriment of the destitute and the distressed. Several schoo s
kept by the Mujtahids at their private houses ; and that o ec
Mujtahid was attended in 1905 by 150 to 200 P^P 1 s - 6
advent of the Sardar Leader of a tribe or a polity; also refers to a military rank or title given to a commander of an army or division. -i-Mukarram in 'Arabistan in 1905 the P .
importance of the Dizful Mujtahids was very considerable ; tn0 y
authorities then could only make themselves obeyed w en ^
bought, or otherwise secured, the countenance of the P r ® ° , j
Mujtahid faction of the day ; and Lur and Arab chiefs of the neighbo^noo
who had cause to distrust the intentions of the Persian Governor
only comply with his summons to appear if it were accompanie(
safe-conduct from the chief Mujtahid.
Other reli" There are Muitabids also at Bushehr. 'Ulama of differen
oMhe ea 618 are fonnd at various places, such as Muhammareh ; and ordinary
Shi'ahs. are numerous everywhere.
would
1 by a
t sor^
Mullas
i^ntion
f.to wt:
jff'pliica
jyi ^
Relations of the Shi'ahs of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. with India.
Shi'ah reli- Notwithstanding the Shi'ah pilgrimages from India to .^ a l^ r i!j s h '4 lv i (
gicms visit gi-s Karbala and the existence of a domiciled Indian community 111
'Iraq, * the connection between the two countries is a slighter on ^
might have been supposed; and it has not, apparently, any^ pQ™^__3---
* Vide article 44 Turkish 'Iraq " in the Geographical Volume of this Gjize^eer.

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Content

This volume is Volume I, Part II (Historical) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part II contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914, 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (pags v-viii), and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (ix-cxxx). These are also found in Volume I, Part IA of the Gazetteer (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1).

Part II consists of three chapters:

  • 'Chapter X. History of ’Arabistān' (pages 1625-1775);
  • 'Chapter XI. History of the Persian Coast and Islands' (pages 1776-2149);
  • 'Chapter XII. History of Persian Makrān' (pages 2150-2203).

The chapters are followed by nineteen appendices:

Extent and format
1 volume (1165 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part II is arranged into chapters that are sub-divided into numbered periods covering, for example, the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The appendices are sub-divided into lettered subject headings and also contain numbered annexures, as well as charts. Both the chapters and appendices have further subject headings that appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally througout the volume at the bottom of the page which provide further details and references. A 'Detailed Table of Contents' for Part II and the Appendices is on pages cii-cxxx.

Physical characteristics

The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 879, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1503.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2366] (883/1262), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023514764.0x000051> [accessed 28 November 2023]

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