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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2576] (1093/1262)

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The record is made up of 1 volume (1165 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English and Arabic. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers Documents collected in a private capacity. .

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2576
General course of the trade in the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. proper,
1905-1907.
Trucial
Oman.
Qatar.
Bahrain.
From 1905 to 1907 the traffic in arms and ammunition continued
and even increased, but it no longer followed tlie same lines as in the
beginning. To its progress in the Sultanate of "'Oman and in Persian
Makran, the two countries now chiefly in question, we shall return later
on, recording first only such facts connected with the trade as belong to
the region of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Proper.
In Trucial ^Oman the traffic apparently continued at a standstill,
notwithstanding a visit paid by M. Goguyer, the French arms-dealer at
Masqat, to Dibai and Umm-al-Qaiwain in December 1905 and January
1906. This state of affairs may have been due partly to the observance
of their engagements by the Trucial Chiefs ; but the absence both of
further local demand and of facilities for exportation to the interior were
probably factors of greater value.
In Qatar, towards the end of 1906, a flourishing trade was known to
exist at Dohah, where it was estimated that about 2,000 rifles per month
were received from Masqat, entirely by native sailing boat. Several
Shaikhs of the influential a1 Thani family were interested in the traffic,
and six Arab merchants of substance were engaged in it; the price of a
rifle was here higher by Rs. 15 than at Masqat, and a duty of Rs. 8-8-0
was paid to the Shaikh of Dohah by the professional dealers on account
of every weapon imported. Most of the arms and ammunition sold in
Qatar were still destined for the Central Arabian market; but about a
quarter of the whole was now exported to Bahrain for sale to Persians.
In a memorial which the Shaikh of Bahrain submitted in October
1905 to the Government of India and to the British Government, he
complained that he had been compelled to interdict, to his own loss,
the sale of arms in his territories ; but in reply he was reminded that he
had himself shown signs of alarm at the growth of the trade in 1895
and 1898, and that his prohibition of it in the latter year had been
voluntary.
In November 1906 it transpired, partly in consequence of information
given by M. Heynssens, Director-General of Customs at Bushehr, to
Major Cox, the British Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. , that Bahrain was being
utilised as a depot for the export of arms to Persia, part of tbe material
being brought secretly by steamer from Masqat and a larger quantity
shipped over from Qatar in native sailing vessels ; in this manner the
Persian purchasers and the Qatari vendors, who did not willingly
visit each others' ports, were brought into correspondence. A secret
association including among its members some influential persons in the
entourage of the Shaikh of Bahrain, existed for the exploitation of this
business; it was ascertained that the Shaikh's son Hamad was in their
pay ; and the Shaikh himself, who may even have been an interested
party, was at the best an apathetic spectator. By the activity of the
British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. in searching steamers the direct import from

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Content

This volume is Volume I, Part II (Historical) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf The historical term used to describe the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part II contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914, 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (pags v-viii), and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (ix-cxxx). These are also found in Volume I, Part IA of the Gazetteer (IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1).

Part II consists of three chapters:

  • 'Chapter X. History of ’Arabistān' (pages 1625-1775);
  • 'Chapter XI. History of the Persian Coast and Islands' (pages 1776-2149);
  • 'Chapter XII. History of Persian Makrān' (pages 2150-2203).

The chapters are followed by nineteen appendices:

Extent and format
1 volume (1165 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part II is arranged into chapters that are sub-divided into numbered periods covering, for example, the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The appendices are sub-divided into lettered subject headings and also contain numbered annexures, as well as charts. Both the chapters and appendices have further subject headings that appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally througout the volume at the bottom of the page which provide further details and references. A 'Detailed Table of Contents' for Part II and the Appendices is on pages cii-cxxx.

Physical characteristics

The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio with text, on number 879, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 1503.

Written in
English and Arabic in Latin and Arabic script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part II. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2576] (1093/1262), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/2, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023514765.0x00005b> [accessed 21 July 2024]

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