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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1889-90’ [‎210r] (27/64)

The record is made up of 1 volume (30 folios). It was created in 1890. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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RESIDENCY A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. AND MUSCAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOR 1889-90.
to deal with the enemy who kept on retreating as the other party advanced
The development of tins new feature in Omanee tactics was not calculated
upon by the advancing party who had to carry on the pursuit till the enemy
found himselr within the friendly precincts of Eustak.
As it seemed pretty certain now that although Seyyid Ibrahim had <nyen
a friendly refuge to Seyyid Abdul Aziz and his followers at Eustak, he had no
intention of co-operating with him or of giving him any active support and
accordingly as no reason remained for maintaining such a large force to 4atch
any further development of Seyyid Abdul Aziz's scheme, the Sultan wisely
paid off and dismissed most of the men and directed his brother to leave Jimmeh
where he was encamped and to fall back upon Burkeh whence he could ^
easly watch the enemy's movements.
Eor the next few weeks the situation remained unaltered, and, although
various rumours were in circulation, nothing beyond a few intertribal raids,
mainly incidental on the disturbed condition of the country then existing,'
occurred. About the beginning of February the Rahabiyin attacked a Hinawi
caravan consisting of men and property belonging to the Yal-Wahibeh, the
Habus and the Duekeh, in retaliation for the raid committed on them by
Hamud-al-Jahafi on his first advance to the Batineh. In this encounter the
Rahabiyin succeeded in killing six men and in carrying off 40 camels. This
incident might have led to serious complications, had not His Highness the
Sultan succeeded in time to effect a truce between the parties.
When Sheikh Hamud-al-Jahafi first visited Kustak, it was more than
surmised that he had succeeded in winning Sayid Ibrahim over to the cause,
and as under those circumstances in all probability, the latter would have first
attacked Sohar or any other Batineh Ports, it was necessary to reinforce the
garrisons in all these places. The Wali of Sohar, Sayid Hamud Bin Nasir, in
vited the Naim to his assistance, but by the time they could arrive Sayid
Abdul Aziz and Sheikh Hamud were gradually retreating towards Eustak,
and it was apparent that Sayid Ibrahim had no intention of attempting to at
tack Sohar or any other place. The Wali, Sayid Hamud, finding himself now
freer to act, led the new reinforcements to Wadi Kasim with the object of co
operating with Sayid Fahad with whose party he was eventually ordered to
fall back upon Burkeh. The Naim, however, rather suddenly left that place
and found back their way to Sohar, plundering the Yal-Saad on the way and
committing raids near Sohar itself for which reason Sayid Hamud had to be
sent by sea to quiet and dismiss them.
After the retreat of Sayid Abdul Aziz and Sheikh Hamud from the
Batineh, the former remained at Eustak till about the end of March when he
left for the Shamal or the Pirate Coast with the object of visiting Sheikh Zaid-
bin-Khalifeh at Abu-Dabi. Sheikh Hamud, however, not contented with the
share of plunder which had already fallen to his lot in the Batineh, occu
pied himself with his usual pursuit of raiding until being deserted by most of
his followers and unable to retrace his steps to the Sharkiyyeh in safety with
out an escort, on Sayid Abdul Aziz's departure for the Shamal, tendered his
submission to Sayid Badr-bin-Seif who was left in charge at Burkeh after
Sayid Fahad's return to Muscat. His Highness the Sultan deeming it advis
able to accept it allowed him to return to the Sharkiyyeh in the company of a
Gafri Chief.
Thus the close of the official year under report saw another effort of Sayid
Abdul Aziz's to incite the people of Oman to revolt against the present Sul
tan and to accept him as their ruler instead, and, like its predecessois, in fius-
tration, a result which, while it clearly indicates the weakness of his own cause.

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Content

Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Muscat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1899-1900, published by the Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India (Calcutta), forming part of Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Foreign Department, and based on reports sent to Government by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat.

The report is divided up into a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part 1 , is a General Summary (folios 200-203) written by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , Edward Charles Ross and divided up as follows:

  • 1. Oman-Muscat State, records recognition of His Highness Seyyid Feysal-bin-Turki as Sultan and ruler of the Muscat State by the Government of India.
  • 2. Oman-Pirate Coast , gives summary of relations between the various ruling families on the coast and contains a list of the estimated numbers of pearl-fishing boats sailing from Pirate Coast ports.
  • 3. El Bahrain, contains summary of events in Bahrain including reports that a number of members of the Naeem and Salateh tribes from El-Katr [Qatar] have settled in Bahrain.
  • 4. El Katr , includes details of feud between Shaikh Jasim-bin-Mohammed Bin Thani and the Chief of Abu Dhabi and reports on relations between Katr [Qatar] and the Turkish authorities.
  • 5. Nejd and El Hasa, reports that Emir Mohammed "Ibn Rashid" exercises authority over all of Nejd and comments on the energetic administration of the Muteserrif (Governor) of El-Hasa. Also records robberies from a number of boats in Kateef (Al Qatif) harbour.
  • 6. Fars and Persian Coast , summarises political developments in the region and mentions a summer cholera epidemic that is discussed in greater detail in Appendix C.
  • 7. Persian Arabistan, summary of political and trading developments in the region, also mentions Cholera epidemic in Mohammerah [Khorramshahr].
  • 8. Persian Baluchistan , summary of political developments in the region, notes the cruelty and misconduct of the Governor of Baluchistan, Abul Fath Khan.
  • 9. Slave Traffic, summary of the status of slave traffic in the region, records details of some slaves manumitted by the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. .

Part 1 contains the following appendices (folios 204-208):

A) Genealogical Table of Chief Arab Families of Persian Arabistan;

B) Table of Eliyat tribes of South-Western and Central Persia;

C) Notes on Cholera in Persia, by Surgeon-Major T. Ffrench Mullen;

D) Meteorological Tables.

Part 2, is a resume of Muscat Affairs (folios 209-210) written by Atmarim Sadashiv Jayakar, Surgeon-Major, In Charge Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , Muscat. The resume provides a summary of political and military developments in Muscat throughout the year.

Part 3, is a Report (folios 211-212) on the Trade of South Persia and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for the Year 1889, written by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , Edward Charles Ross. Part 3 contains the following appendix (folios 213-221): A) Series of Tabular Statistics tables related to trade in the region.

Part 4, is a Muscat Trade Report for the Year 1889-90, the report (folios 222-227), written by Atmarim Sadashiv Jayakar, Surgeon-Major, In Charge Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , Muscat, contains a number of detailed tables related to trade to/from Muscat.

Extent and format
1 volume (30 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into a number of sections and subsections, with statistic data in tabular format directly following written sections. There is a contents page at the front of the report (folio 199) which list the report's contents.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: There is a foliation sequence, which is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. It begins on the first folio, on number 198, and ends on the last folio, on number 227.

Pagination: The volume contains an original typed pagination sequence.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration report of the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Muscat Political Agency for 1889-90’ [‎210r] (27/64), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/58, No 274, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/get-highlighted-words/81055/vdc_100023549668.0x00001d> [accessed 13 November 2019]

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