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‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97 (Foreign Dept serial no. 92). Calcutta: Supt. Govt. Printing, 1897 & Appendices to the Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97’ [‎223r] (13/31)

The record is made up of 1 volume (35 folios). It was created in 1897. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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KESIDENCT AND MASKAT POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOR THE TEAR 1896-97
Several minor slave transactions of a local and unimportant character
came to light. In one of these a small party of Baluch slaves, for the most
part hoys, who had probably been kidnapped, were shipped at Wadam on the
Batineh Coast, a place of evil repute in this connection—for Lingah. An
adult of the party there made his escape, and the remainder were carried to
Dehay, where two more after escaping fell into the hands of the Arabs of
Khan, a dependency of Shargah. These were recovered and sent to Maskat,
where on the clue furnished by Feroz's evidence proceedings were taken result
ing in the conviction of a large number of slave dealers. An attempt at
re-enslavement of a liberated slave on the Persian coast was reported, he was
recovered after some months at Lingah, and handed over to the Commander of
H. M. S, Sphinx.
Six slaves who, after effecting their escape from Shargah, had managed to
reach the Telegraph Station at Jask, were brought to Bushire, and being there
liberated were conveyed to Maskat at their own desire.
A more serious case was the kidnapping of 17 men on the South Arabian
Coast, by an armed party of the Yal Saad, who carried them by boat to the
Batineh Coast, and thence sent them by land to the Pirate Coast or the in
terior. This act was committed in February 1896, but the facts did not come
to light till the beginning of the year under report, on the information of one
of the slaves who had escaped. The Sheikh of the Yal Saad who was directly
implicated was imprisoned by the Sultan, and later died in confinement. Only
one other of the party was traced in the possession of the Bedouin, and as it
was impossible to obtain his freedom without ransom, the disbursement of the
sum required was sanctioned by Government.
11.—PIRACY.
Some piracies were committed by the Beni Hajar robber tribe in Bahrein
waters.
Vigorous action for the suppression of piracy at the mouth of the Shat-el*
Arab was pressed on the Turkish and Persian authorities jointly by the
British Consular authorities at Busreh and Mohammerah at the urgent instance
of the British Officers, both sides, while still maintaining each that the liabi
lity rested on the other, agreed to adopt measures of prevention, by appointing
posts along the river, where vessels should anchor at night under adequate
protection, and by arranging for the nightly patrol of the river by armed boats.
A visit of inspection to certain of these posts was made by the British Consuls,
in company with Sheikh Mizzal, the Perso-Arab Governor of Mohammerah.
The effect of these measures was very satisfactory, and the British Indian
boats visiting the river for their usual cargo of dates in autumn enjoyed
immunity from the danger to which they had previously been exposed.
In April of 1896 a bold piracy was committed on a boat from Koweit, off
the mouth of the river, the Nakhuda The (usually Arab) captain or master of a local boat. being killed, two traders wounded, and
some 3,000 rupees worth of goods and cash being plundered.
13.—ROYAL NAVY.
H. M. S. Lapwing was on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. station at the opening of
the year under report, and was relieved in May by H. M. S. Sphinx,
In the autumn H. M. S. Lapwing was stationed in the Shat-el-Arab,
and was later relieved by H. M. S. Redbreast, which finally left the Gulf
at the close of the official year.
13.—OFFICIAL CHANGES.
There was no change in the personnel of the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. during the
year.

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Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Maskat [Muscat] Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1896-97 followed by a separate series of appendices to this report. Both published by the Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India (Calcutta), forming part of Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Foreign Department, and based on reports sent to Government by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat.

The report is divided up into a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part 1 , is a general summary (folios 220-223) written by Colonel Frederick Alexander Wilson, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , that gives a summary of developments in the region during the past year. It is divided up as follows:

1. Oman-Maskat Coast.

2. Oman Pirate Coast.

3. Bahrein [Bahrain].

4. El Hasa [Al Hasa].

5. Katif [Al Qatif] and Katr [Qatar].

6. Kowait [Kuwait].

7. Persian Arabistan.

8. Fars and Persian Coast.

9. Persian Baluchistan and Mekran.

10. Slave Trade.

11. Piracy.

12. Royal Navy.

13. Official Changes.

Part 2 , is an Administration Report of the Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for the Year 1896-97 (folios 224-225) written by Captain Francis Granville Beville, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul, Maskat. The report provides a summary of political and military developments in the region throughout the previous year.

Part 4 (sic), is a Maskat Trade Report for the Year 1896-97 (folios 225v-226) written by Captain Francis Granville Beville, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul, Maskat. Appendix A (folios 226v-228) that follows the report contains the following tables:

Table 1 - Imports into Maskat.

Table 2 - Exports from Maskat.

Table 3 - Showing total number and tonnage of vessels of each nation that entered the Port of Maskat.

Table 4 - Showing total number and tonnage of vessels of each nation that cleared from the Port of Maskat.

Part 5 , is a Report on the Trade and Commerce of Mohammerah for the Year 1896 (folios 228v-229) written by W McDouall, Vice-Consul, Mohammerah. Appendix A (229v-231) that follows the report contains a series of tables related to trade to/from Mohammerah.

A separate series of appendices that follows the Administration report is contained on folios 233-267 and includes two meteorological tables and a Trade Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for 1896 (folios 236-237) written by Malcolm John Meade, Officiating Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The trade report itself has an appendix (folios 238-267) that contains a series of 27 tables related to several aspects of trade in the region.

Extent and format
1 volume (35 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into a number of sections and subsections, with statistic data in tabular format directly following written sections. There is a contents page at the front of the report (folio 219) which list the report's contents.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97 (Foreign Dept serial no. 92). Calcutta: Supt. Govt. Printing, 1897 & Appendices to the Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97’ [‎223r] (13/31), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/71, No 347, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023555834.0x00000f> [accessed 21 February 2020]

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