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‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97 (Foreign Dept serial no. 92). Calcutta: Supt. Govt. Printing, 1897 & Appendices to the Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97’ [‎224r] (15/31)

The record is made up of 1 volume (35 folios). It was created in 1897. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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RESIDENCY A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. AND MASKA.T POLITICAL AGENCY An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. FOR THE YEA.R 1896-97.
13
part ii.—administration report oe the maskat politi
cal agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. eor the year 1893-97.
The past year was one of considerable importance to the Sultan, death by
violence having removed the bitterest
Political. . ,, i
opponent the rulers or Maskat have had
for the past 25 years.
Since the imposition of the punitive tax upon the Hinawi in August 1895,
Sheikh Saleh-bin-Ali al Harthi had used his best endeavours to turn this
circumstance to account. In May 1898, Saleh found his opportunity. The
Sultan, partly with a view to carrying out the wishes of the Government of
India in regard to the completion of the indemnity to British subjects for
losses incurred, within the period fixed, and which he considered impossible
upon the basis originally decided upon, and also partly with a view to reple
nishing his empty exchequer, decided to impose a tax upon the produce of
the Ghafiris as well as upon that already imposed upon the rebel Hinawi.
Saleh at once seized the opportunity thus offered him and effected a
coalition between the Beni Ruaheh (Hinawi) and a portion of the Beni Jabir
(Ghafiri), and proceeded to attack Seja which was held by the Beni Hadram
and by such of the Jabir as remained faithful to His Highness the Sultan. Saleh
himself, though upwards of 75 years of age, assumed command of the allied
tribes. During one of the petty skirmishes that ensued, a stray bullet
deprived the rebels of their leader, and ended the life of the bitterest and the
most able opponent of the ruling house. Had the Sultan at once seized the
opportunity the death of this famous leader gave him, and attacked the rebels,
there seems to be no doubt but that he would have been successful. Saleh
was killed early in September, and it was not until late in October that the
Sultan with a force of about 7,000 men left for the interior. As soon as the
Sultan heard of the opposition that would be raised against the increase in
taxation, he cancelled the orders imposing a tax upon the produce of the
Ghafiris, and he thus was able to detach the Beni Jabir from the coalition
consisting principally of the Beni Ruaheh. The long delay that took place
prior to a start enabled the Beni Ruaheh to overcome their first panic at the
loss of their leader, and they were accordingly in a position to oppose the
Sultan's advance. The difference between the opposing forces was that the
Beni Ruaheh were fighting for their homes, whereas the Sultan's troops were
mercenaries, who like most Omani Arabs show extreme valour so long as they
receive their pay and are not within striking distance of the enemy. As a
natural result of relying only upon such troops, the Sultan at the critical
moment was deserted by most of the Sheikhs who had, though really friendly to
the enemy, professed allegiance to His Highness, and he returned to Maskat,
without having accomplished anything beyond the expenditure of about
$60,000.
Owing to a dispute between two factions in Nakhl, there appeared to be
fears of an outbreak in that district in the month of June.
The Sultan accompanied by a few hundred men proceeded to the place
and was able to restore order without further trouble.
With the above exceptions, and the usual petty intertribal disputes
which appear to be a necessity of existence in Oman, the country was not
in a disturbed state during the year under report.
At the close of the previous year, the Sultan's rule had ceased in Dhofar,
although the Shanafareh were favourable
Dhofar. t0 llim ° and Merbat was still garrisoned
by His Highness' men.

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Administration Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. and Maskat [Muscat] Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for 1896-97 followed by a separate series of appendices to this report. Both published by the Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, India (Calcutta), forming part of Selections from the Records of the Government of India, Foreign Department, and based on reports sent to Government by the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Muscat.

The report is divided up into a number of sections and subsections, as follows:

Part 1 , is a general summary (folios 220-223) written by Colonel Frederick Alexander Wilson, Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , that gives a summary of developments in the region during the past year. It is divided up as follows:

1. Oman-Maskat Coast.

2. Oman Pirate Coast.

3. Bahrein [Bahrain].

4. El Hasa [Al Hasa].

5. Katif [Al Qatif] and Katr [Qatar].

6. Kowait [Kuwait].

7. Persian Arabistan.

8. Fars and Persian Coast.

9. Persian Baluchistan and Mekran.

10. Slave Trade.

11. Piracy.

12. Royal Navy.

13. Official Changes.

Part 2 , is an Administration Report of the Maskat Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for the Year 1896-97 (folios 224-225) written by Captain Francis Granville Beville, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul, Maskat. The report provides a summary of political and military developments in the region throughout the previous year.

Part 4 (sic), is a Maskat Trade Report for the Year 1896-97 (folios 225v-226) written by Captain Francis Granville Beville, Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. and Consul, Maskat. Appendix A (folios 226v-228) that follows the report contains the following tables:

Table 1 - Imports into Maskat.

Table 2 - Exports from Maskat.

Table 3 - Showing total number and tonnage of vessels of each nation that entered the Port of Maskat.

Table 4 - Showing total number and tonnage of vessels of each nation that cleared from the Port of Maskat.

Part 5 , is a Report on the Trade and Commerce of Mohammerah for the Year 1896 (folios 228v-229) written by W McDouall, Vice-Consul, Mohammerah. Appendix A (229v-231) that follows the report contains a series of tables related to trade to/from Mohammerah.

A separate series of appendices that follows the Administration report is contained on folios 233-267 and includes two meteorological tables and a Trade Report of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. for 1896 (folios 236-237) written by Malcolm John Meade, Officiating Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The trade report itself has an appendix (folios 238-267) that contains a series of 27 tables related to several aspects of trade in the region.

Extent and format
1 volume (35 folios)
Arrangement

The report is arranged into a number of sections and subsections, with statistic data in tabular format directly following written sections. There is a contents page at the front of the report (folio 219) which list the report's contents.

Written in
English in Latin script
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‘Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97 (Foreign Dept serial no. 92). Calcutta: Supt. Govt. Printing, 1897 & Appendices to the Administration Report on the Persian Gulf Political Residency and Maskat Political Agency for 1896-97’ [‎224r] (15/31), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/V/23/71, No 347, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/get-highlighted-words/81055/vdc_100023555834.0x000011> [accessed 19 November 2019]

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