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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2] (145/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

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2
Progresiive
dUcoveries
of the Portu
guese,leading
tn the estab
lishment of
the Cape
route to
India in
1498,
Dom Pedro's
Miision,
1416.
Expeditions
»nd Missions
of De Diaz,
Rabbi
Abraham,
and de Covil-
hao, 1486-87.
Da Gama's
voyage by the
('ape to
India, 1497-
99.
The eves of the Portuguese were early turned towards the East. It
mlv even have been hy Dom Henn^ue (1394-I46(;) known ae ■'The
Navigator" whose blood was half English, that the idea of reaching
India by circumnavigating Africa was first formed; hif, if so.itremaioed
sterile until after liis deatli.
Tn 14-10, befort- the traditional overland routts to the East ^ ^ ePn
blocked by Turkish conquests, Dom Pedro, another half English so " of
Pom Joao I of Portugal, brother of Dom Herrique, proceeded " to the
Court of the Grand Turk, and to that of the Grand Sultan of Babvloni;.)
wliere he met with a magnificent reception.
It was only under Dom Afi'onso \ (1443-81) and Dom JoSo II
(1481-95), however, that the Portuguese began to push successfully
southwards and eastwards. Dom Joao II vas anxious to contract an
alliam e with " Prester John/'a Christian potentate in the East whose
existence was by some deemed fabulous, ir reality the ruler of Abys
sinia, a land as yet unknown to Europems ; it was his pious desire to
extend the bounds of Christendom; and it wis no less his ambition to open
a new commercial highway to India and t o discover the lands whence
were brought pepper, cinnamon, and otaer spices. With these objects
in view the King of Portugal sent abroad various expeditions and
M issions. In 1486 Bartholomeu de Diaz rounded the Cape of Good
Ho|je, but without becoming aware that he had turned the southern point
of Africa. In 1487 Joao Peres de Covilhao and Affonso de Paiva set
forth in search of the spice countries Parting from his companion at
Aden, Covilhao found his way to Cannanore, Calicut, Goa, Hornuiz
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , Zaila, and Safali ; ultimately he returned so far
westwards as Cairo. At Cairo he fell in with Rabbi Abraham of Beja,
who under Portuguese Royal patronage, had lately travelled to Baghdad
and Persia with Joseph of Lamego atd had reported on the island of
Hormuz. Covilhao and the Rabbi thin re-visited Hormuz in company,
alter which Covilhao came again to Aden ; ultimately having found
Prester John ; in Abyssinia, he settled permanently in that country.
At last in August 1498 ^ asco da Gamawhohad sailed from Portugal
in 149/, reached India via the Cape. His cruise, one of the most momen
tous in history, ended at Lisbon in September 1499. Its almost instan
taneous result was a revolution in the trade of Europe and a great acces
sion of importance to Portugal, whose Kings thenceforth described them*
selves as " Lords of the Conquest, Navigation and Commerce of India,
Ethiopia, Arabia, and Persia/'—a style presently confirmed by the Pope.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎2] (145/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x000092> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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