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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎6] (149/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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6
First Portu
guese expedi
tion to
Basrah, about
1529.
Turkish
descent on
the Coast of
India, 1538.
Friction
between tlie
Portuguese
and the
Shaikh of
Hormuz,
1542
Expulsion
of the Turks
from Qatif.
Portuguese
second
expedition
to Basrah,
and retalia
tory craise
of Pir hiaig,
1660.
arrears of tribute due by the ruler of Hormuz. In 1529 Nono daCunha,
Governor of the Portuguese possessions in India, visited Hormuz and,
under orders from the King- of Portugal, deported iiais Sharafu and sent
him to Portugal. Bahrain revolted against the Shaikh of Hormuz; and
a Portuguese expedition was sent against the islands, but failed through
being insufficiently equipped.
It was about this time that the name of the Turks began to be heard
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The ruler of Basrah—probably an Arab—having
undertaken to prevent the Turks from trading there if the Portuguese
would help him against a neighbouring ehief in Mesopotamia, Melchior
Tavarez de Sousa went to his aid and ascended the rivers Tigris and
Euphrates. The Basrah Ruler however refused to fulfil his promises of
impeding Turkish trade; and De Sousa in revenge burned two "towns"
at his departure.
Perhaps as a reply to Portuguese action in the Ked Sea, whither the
Portuguese authorities in India from time to time sent expeditions, and
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , a huge Turkish fleet fitted out and commanded by
Sulaiman Pasha, Governor of Egypt, arrived on the coast of India in
1538. Desperate efforts were made by it. during more than a month to
capture Diu from the Portuguese, but they were not successful.
I he period following was one of incessant struggles between the
Portuguese and the Turks in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The relations of the
1 oituguese with their vassal, the King of Hormuz, were far from satis
factory ; and in 154:2, the latter being unable or neglecting to discharge
aireais of tribute which were due from him, the Portuguese assumed
direct control of his custom houses and satisfied their claims themselves.
Open conflict between the Portuguese and the Turks in the Persian
Gulf began about 1550. In that year the people of Qatif, renouncing
it 'would seem an allegiance to Hormuz, placed themselves under the
Plot' c tion of the Turks, who had only recently taken possession of Basrah.
The Shaikh of Hormuz was greately chagrined by the defection of Qatif;
and the late ruler of that district, who had been expelled, appealed for
help to the Portuguese. In these circumstances an armament of 19
ships, cailying 1,210 men, was fitted out in India and despatched under
Dom Antonio de IVoronha to Qatif, from which, with the help of the
adherents of the Shaikh of Hormuz, the Turks were quickly driven out.
expedition visited Basrah also ; but the Commander fearing
eachery did not lemain long or undertake operations there.
replied t0 the Portu g uese attack h sending a "pirate"
sian Gulf with a large fleet. 1 his
named Pir Baig to cruise in the Per

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎6] (149/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x000096> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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