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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎12] (155/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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12
: f i
Eetablish-
ment of a
poaition in
India by the
English East
India Com
pany, 1600-
13.
"of Great Britain, with frank offer of free commerce unto all Hig
" Highness's subjects throughout all the Persian^ dominions, etc.-"
During- his stay in England, Sherley^s wife Teresia, a Circassian lady
received by him in marriage from Shah 'Abbas, gave birth to a son; and
to this child the Oueen of England became godmother and Prince Henrj
godfather. His political negotiations, however, failed; there was some
doubt as to the validity or scope of his commission; the East India
merchants were opposed to his projects, which they apprehended might
disturb the trade with Turkey; and in the end Sherley, who had
become Sir Robert Sherley, left England without having effected
anything. Sir Thomas Roe, who was soon afterwards to play a distin
guished part in the development of English commerce in the East, was
a witness of Sherley's manoeuvres, and formed of him the unfavourable
opinion that "as hee is dishonest, soe hee is subtile." Finally in January
1613, Sherley, accompanied by Sir Thomas Powel Avho held a military
command under the Shah, left Dover for Persia in the Company's ship
" Expedition/' on which he had been provided with a passage by King
James's orders; he was furnished apparently with royal letters, but only
of courtesy, to Shah 'Abbas. The voyage was protracted by bad weather,
which detained the ship for 28 days off Dhufar on the coast of Southern
Arabia; circumstances made it inconvenient to disembark at the
entrance of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , as has been intended ; a plot to seize the
ship by the local governor of Gwadar, who was then in rebellion
against the Shah, was very nearly successful; but at last, in September
1613, Sherley landed on the coast of Sind, and, after visiting the
Mughal Emperor Jahangir at Ajmir, returned by land to the capital of
Shah 'Abbas,
Meanwhile the English East India Company had begun to acquire
for themselves a commercial footing in India, and, between 1600 and 1612,
twelve trading fleets or "Voyages" were despatched to the East by
merchant subscribers belonging to the Company. In 1608 the first
English ship arrived at Surat, and the commander, William Hawkins, who
brought a letter of recommendation from King James, was at tirst well
received by the Great Mughal; but he was again virtually dismissed in
1611, in consequence of Portuguese intrigues; and in the same year
permission to trade at Surat was refused to Sir Henry Middleton, the
commander of the Sixth Voyage, who consequently took Hawkins away
with him and made reprisals upon Surat traders in the Red Sea. In
1612 Thomas Best, arriving with another fleet, succeeded in obtaining a
hading agreement from the local authorities at Surat, which was confirm-

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎12] (155/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x00009c> [accessed 20 May 2018]

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