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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎18] (161/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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18
Journey of
the mission
to Shiraz,
January-
April, 1617.
Establish
ment of a
Factory at
Shiraz, and
dissensions
in the
mission,
April-May,
1617.
that the object of the mission to Jashk was not to form a settlement at
the place, but to show the readiness of the Company to take up the
Persian trade; he apologised for the poorness of the cargo sent j and he
explained that the requirements of the English were (1) a port open to
themselves alone, or to all nations indifferently, where they might land
their goods under the privileges granted in such cases, (2) some arrange
ment for fixing the prices of the imports and exports to be exchanged
there, and (3) the establishment of a " staple mart" on or near the
coast, to which, for convenience of trade, the Shah's silks should be
brought down. Already, before the departure of the " James" from
Surat, Sir Thomas had written apprising the authorities in England of
the line he intended to take, and had suggested a warning to Spain, to the
effect that any attempt on her part to exclude other nations from the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. trade would be treated by England as a casus lelli. About
October 1617 Roe received instructions from the Company in London,
authorising a cautious line of procedure very similar to that which he had
himself proposed, also a letter from King James, approving of his
endeavours to open commercial relations with the Shah and empowering
him " to perfect and conclude, or cause to be perfected and concluded, a
u treaty of Commerce betwixt the said great Sophy and us, for the mutual
" good of the subiectes and dominions of us both, without attending from
" hence any further directions then a confirmacion only of that treaty,
" which shall be by us foorthwith ratified, according as you shall in our
" name undertake the same."
After the departure of the "James " the mission were detained for
some time at Minab by the corrupt governor of that place, who, after
accepting their presents, seems to have taken bribes from the Portuguese
to prevent their going further. Connock, however, pressed on to Shiraz
to interview the superior authorities ; and the mission, having at length
been allowed to proceed, reached Lar on the 11th of March. On the 2nd
of April thej'- arrived at Shiraz, where they were well received by the
Governor; but meanwhile Connock had left for Isfahan in search of the
Shah.
As Shiraz appeared to be a suitable place for a Factory, and as the
case was provided for in the instructions of the mission, Barker established
himself there with Bell, and professed to consider himself for the future
independent of Connock's authority. From this time onwards there was
serious friction between the two senior Factors ; and Barker, who was
supposed to stand well with Sir Thomas Roe, apparently set himself to
thwart the leader of the mission by every means in hw power, A majority
of the Factors, however still adhered to Connock,

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎18] (161/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000a2> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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