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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎39] (182/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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39
final catastrophe, orders were sent out from Europe by the King of
Portugal that every effort should be made to keep Masqat and that
" Cassapo " (perhaps Khasab) should be strengthened; at Masqat Shaikhs
and Moors were not to be allowed to live in the town. If possible, a
port should be created at " Bandaly " near "Comoras" (Bander 'Abbas).
After the fall of Masqat, a Portuguese fleet was sent to the Gulf and Position of
apparently prospected for a new settlement on the coasts of Lar [i .e., ^ s ,
probably of the modern Bastak and Lingeh districts) and on those of Oulf after
Ilasa. The island of Hanjam seems to have been tendered by the
Persians, with rights of fortifications; but the Portuguese did not accept 'Oman. 1650-
the offer, from an impression, apparently, that a site at " Cassapo" 5,i
(perhaps Khasab) or at some other point upon the Arabian coast would be
more advantageous. The Portuguese Factory and privileges at Kung,
founded about 1625, were maintained; but, with the cessation of the
power of the Portuguese to compel vessels to call there, the prosperity of
the place seems gradually to have departed. The Portuguese had thus
been dislodged from their last remaining territorial foothold in the Persian
Gulf, and the Portuguese flag, as familiar in Gulf waters during nearly a
century and a half as that of a local power, had become the ensign of
a distant and foreign nation,
The fall of the Portuguese was due to several causes, principally
perhaps to violence and bad faith in dealing with their Oriental neigh- Portuguese
bours ; but also, largely, to jealousies and dissensions among themselves. P owei -
They founded no mercantile company, as did their rivals the English
and the Dutch, their trade being instead inefficiently administered as a
royal monopoly ; and, in the end, even the military basis on which their
power rested became insecure for want of discipline and of professional
foresight. The low level of Portuguese naval discipline in 1624-25 was
remarked by the Italian traveller Pietro della Valle, who, notwith
standing his marked sympathy for fellow-Catholics, could not forbear from
contrasting what he saw on Portuguese vessels with the conditions that
prevailed on board English ships. The verdict of the Portuguese
historian himself is given in these words: "The ruin of our affairs
" proceeds from the little regard the great ones have for the lesser sort;
" and the covetousness of the small ones, which made them forget their
" country and their honour The Portugueses can recover what is
" lost, but know not how to preserve what they gain, which is the
" most glorious part, it being the work of fortune to gain, and that of
" prudence to preserve."*
* See The Portugues Asia, Vol. Ill, pages 382 — 3 (btevens translation of
Manuel de Fariay Sous a).

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎39] (182/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000b7> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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