Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎46] (189/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

46
First war
between the
English and
the Dutch,
1652-54.
Foundation
of the French
Kast India
Company,
1664.
Second war
between the
English and
the Dutch,
1065-67.
War between
the Prerich
and the
Dutch, assis
ted in turn
by the
English,
1672-78.
During a series of years tension had been increasing between England
and Holland in consequence of commemal rivalry between the two
nations, and especially of aggressions committed by the Dutch in the
East against the English East India Company. In 1651 a Navigation
Act was passed in England, of which the object was to destroy the Dutch
carrying trade; and in 1652 Cromwell proceeded to declare war against
Holland. The conflict thus begun for mastery of the seas lasted two years;
but no clear superiority was gained by either belligerent in the operationB,
which were conducted on the one side by Tromp and Ruyter and on
the other by Blake and Monk; and the military result, when in 1654
peace was made by the burgher party of Amsterdam, was open to
dispute. A joint Anglo-Dutch Commission, however, which met
after the war, awarded damages to the amount of £S5,000 to the English
East India Company ; and these were duly paid by the Dutch Company,
who were obliged also to afford other reparation.
The effect of this struggle on affairs in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was neither
distinct nor permanent; but we are obliged, by the total absence of
important historical landmarks in that region between the fall of
Hormnz and the end of the 17th century, to adopt the first Anglo-Dutch
svar as a fixed point in our narrative.
In 1664 an East India Company was formed in France; the author
ity was a charter granted by Louis XIV on the advice of his finance
minister, Colbert.
In 1665 the Navigation Act was re-enacted in England and a second
war with Holland began. An English success off Lowestoft in 1665
was followed by a doubtful victory for the Dutch in the Channel in 1666;
eventually, however, the Hollanders were driven into their ports; and
the peace of Breda, in 1667, brought hostilities to an end. The reaction
of this contest on Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. affairs is even less easily discoverable than
that of the war of 1652-54; but in India it occasioned a blockade of the
English Company's ships at Surat by the Dutch.
Not long after these events the ambition of Louis XIV of France
brought him into collision with both Holland and Spain; war against
Holland was declared in 1672; and in 1676 the combined Dutch and
Spanish fleets w T ere destroyed in the Mediterranean by the French. The
King of England (Charles II) at first made common cause with France
against Holland, and in 1672 a somewhat indecisive engagement between
English and Dutch vessels took place at Solebay; but public opinion in
England was hostile to France, compelling a peace with Holland in 1671;
and towards the end of the six years' struggle England was ranged, with

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎46] (189/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000be> [accessed 17 October 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000be">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;46] (189/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000be">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0189.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image