Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎54] (197/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

' ' '«
64
was authorised to arrange convoys for Mughal vessels with pilgrims
proceeding to the Red Sea, and the Old Company's ships were regularly
commissioned to make prizes of pirates ] but as yet nothing had been
effected against the latter, and the English, from this circumstance,
had become at Surat " as despicable as the Portuguese in India and
" as odious as the Jews in Spain/' The trade of the English, Dutch and
French at Surat was now again stopped by the Mughal Government; and
the Dutch, in despair, temporarily removed their shipping to Batavia.
In 1700 Captain Gillam and 9 other pirates, who had been taken, were
executed in England j but the conflict between the English Old and New
East India Companies paralysed both for action against buccaneerB. In
1702, on a request from the Old and New Companies at their union, a
small naval expedition was sent by the English G overnment to deal with
piracy in the East, but its achievements were inconsiderable; and in 1703
or 1704 a fresh piracy caused the Mughals to seize and confine once more
the English Agents at Surat, whose native brokers were at the same time
maltreated and compelled to sign bonds for six lakhs of rupees to be paid
as compensation to the sufferers. The wars with the French in Europe
now stood in the way of decided action against the pirates, among whom
the Masqat Arabs, encouraged doubtless by the license of European
adventurers, had been conspicuous ever since 1695. Abetment of piracy
was among the charges bandied by the Old and New English East India
Companies against each other ; and, while on one occasion two of the
Old Company's ships did actually mutiny and become pirates, it is prob
able that on the other hand some of the 1 nterlopers who in the beginning
supported the New Company were themselves engaged in nefarious
practices.
It is clear that circumstances such as these cannot but have affected
adversely the growth of English trade in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and in fact,
in 1689, it was expressly reported from Bandar 'Abbas that commerce
had received a severe check through the appearance of an English corsair
in Gulf waters. The crew of the vessel just mentioned plundered the
Portuguese Factory at Kung, and the Company's ship " Caesar" was
sent in pursuit of her, but without result.
Embassy of The appointment of Sir William Norris, at the instance of the New
lo the Mughal ^ oni P aii y> as Ambassador from the King of England to the Mughal
Emperor has already been, mentiotied j his instructions appear to have
been general and his powers discretionarv, but the object of his mission
was undoubtedly to place the New Company's trade in India on a sound
basis, uy obtaining suitable Farmaiis from the Emperor and, it may tave
Court, 1699
1702.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎54] (197/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000c6> [accessed 14 August 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000c6">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;54] (197/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575941.0x0000c6">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0197.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image