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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎57] (200/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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57
wt lii;
fandmii
ODoffc^
for ro®®'
that the Farman of Shah 'Abbaf! I in favour of the Company had lapsed
and to suspend, in a measure, all coneessionB of later date. Trade, whether
export or import, thus became for a time impossible ; but the Factors
continued to occupy the Company's premises at Bandar 'Abbas in order to
maintain the right to the same and to the half share in the Bandar 'Abbas
customs. By the absorption of the Adventurers in the Company in 1657
these difficulties were removed.
The disappearance of the Merchant Adventurers and the continuance
of the East India Company on its original footing deprived the Shah's
Government of all excuse for interfering further with English trade in
Persia; but the attitude of the Persians continued to be unfavourable,
especially in the matter of the Bandar 'Abbas customs ; and, so unsatis
factory did the position become, that the Company were led to contemplate
the adoption of forcible measures for obtaining redress. In 1659 it was
proposed by the Presidency at Surat to establish, partly with this
object, a station and garrison at Masqat; and negotiations with the local
Arab authorities were undertaken, but without success. In 1660 the
Court of the Company in England recommended a blockade of Bandar
'Abbas or of the Persian coast; but the Surat Council found themselves
unable to act upon these instructions as at least eight ships were
required, whereas only two were available of which the crews had become
ineffective, while fixed bases, such as were essential for obtaining water
and supplies, would have to be secured. In 1663 the Court at home
advised that either two or three honest and able servants should be left
at Bandar 'Abbas to trade and to recover the half share of the customs on
a commission to themselves of 5 per cent., the remainder of the staff being
withdrawn; or that the whole establishment should be removed, and a
Factor sent instead from Surat once in the year to claim the moiety of the
customs. Meanwhile, at Bandar 'Abbas, the demeanour of the Persians,
incited by the Dutch, grew extremely insolent; under the orders of the
Shahbandar the native broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. of the English Factory was so grievously
beaten, and that in the presence of Mr. Craddock, that he was " carried
away doubtful of life, " some hundreds of Tumans being afterwards ex
torted from him; and in many ways the powerlessness of the English was
made painfully apparent. The Presidency of Surat considered that it would
be useless, as well as very expensive, to send a representative to
complain at Isfahan ; but they still held that a blockade was inadvisable,
inasmuch as, Persia being a land power and having no maritime
interests, the blockade might have to be maintained for two or
three years in order to produce the desired effect. Moreover, the
The East
India Com
pany's diffi
culties with
the Persian
Government
and reduction
of their es
tablishment
in Persia,
1657-64

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎57] (200/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000001> [accessed 14 August 2018]

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