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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎67] (210/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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67
v »» OWlt 01
' s Period, asmffc
i po^er®-
1 to be a &» M
'oposal to ktl
East India Company in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , left Isfahan for Bandar
^orfeditj Abbas. He remained at Bandar ""Abbas until the end of June 1688
and then sailed for Batavia, whence he proceeded on his better-known
expedition to Japan. During his stay in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. Dr. Kaempfer,
though he suffered much from ill-health, made a careful study of the
natural history of the Bandar ^Abbas district; the results are contained
in his Amoenitatum Exoticarvm Fasciculi and include an elaborate mono
graph on the date-palm.
About 1688, or from the time that Dutch interests began to be
subordinated in Europe to those of England, the two countries being now
in alliance and at war with France, the Hollanders began to lose credit in
Persia. They were at this time endeavouring to compete with the English
in the importation of Indian-made goods, but the English were able to
prevent their obtaining a monopoly of Kirman wool.
In 1690 a Dutch Ambassador visited Isfahan, accompanied by a
magnificent retinue and bringing valuable presents ; he sought to obtain
from the Shah a monopoly for the Dutch of the Kirman wool trade, but
in this he could not succeed. On his return to Bandar J Abbas in 1691,
however, by gaining over the Shahbandar and others, he was able to
obstruct English trade in that neighbourhood to such an extent that the
English Factors found it advisable to send a whole cargo of newly arrived
goods direct to Isfahan.
In ] 695, difficulties between the Persians and the Arabs in the Gulf
having become acute through repeated attacks by the latter upon Persian
I to-t shipping, it was feared that the Dutch might come to the aid of the
jjjjj.: Shah-'s Government and so secure preferential trading rigt ts in Persia,
but this fear was not realised; the Dutch, however, at the time enjoyed
the privilege of importing 20,000 Tumans worth of merchandise free into
Isfahan every year, as against a quantity 5,000 Tumans' worth only
passed free to the English. In 1697 chiefly with a view to forestalling
the Dutch, the Company's representatives in Persia offered the ship
' Charles the Second ,} for the purpose of conveying to India an Ambas
sador whom the Shah had accredited to the Mughal Court.
As mentioned already in another place, the Dutch, who had at some
• ^ time obtained a monopoly for the export of silk from Persia by sea,
,^1 protested strongly in 1699 against part payment by the Persians in that
commodity of the English share of customs at Bandar ; Abbas. ft does
not appear whether this protest was ultimately successful, but the Dutch
found means to attach the Shahbandar to their interest and were suspected
of having instigated him to assert, as he did assert, that he had paid
14 a
; of Bam
at Bandar
'AbVias, 1866
Increasing
competition
of the Eng
lish with the
Dutch, 1688-
89.
Dutch Em
bassy to the
Persian
Court, 1690-
91.
Continued
rivalry of the
English and
the Dutch, to
the increasing
disadvantage
of the latter,
1695-1705.
I

Whm
i

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎67] (210/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00000b> [accessed 21 May 2018]

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