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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎73] (216/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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(wS
73
" ing- it comes better Cheap by the Caphala's* in Exchange of other Goods
" from Stambole, i.e., Constantinople, Smirna, Scanderoon, and Aleppo ;
" and that Suffahaun is already over-full of London Cloath, or Sackcloath
" Londre, as they call it. " The Surat Presidency's view of the state of
trade in this year was, however, more favourable than Dr. Fryer's , but
they blamed their representatives for the past delays in shipping Kirman
wool; and in 1678, in consequence of the impoverishment of the people by
scarcity and exactions of the Shah's Government, the outlook again became
unsatisfactory. About this time the English Agent at Bandar 'Abbas
was said to benefit largely by extending his protection, for a consideration,
to native Persian subjects. In 1680 the Persian trade continued depressed,
and orders were given to sell off all the Company's broadcloth and tin at
Bandar 'Abbas for what they would fetch and to buy Kirman wool of better
quality than had been obtained in the previous year ; it was added that,
if prospects did not improve, the Factory at Bandar 'Abbas might have to
be abandoned. In 1 681 business continued unremunerative and the Agent
was desired to retrench expenditure by every means in his power. In
1682 the outstandings of the Company in Persia amounted to £1,000,000,
and trade was still steadily declining.
In 1682 an effort was made to reorganise the Company's trade in the The "roilnd
East by a system of f< round voyages." The "Dragon " was accordingly jgg2 ge '
sent from England to Soqotrah, where she was to be met by a fleet of
three native vessels ; these auxiliaries, after conveying a part of her cargo
to Mokha and obtaining cargoes of coffee and olibanum, were to rejoin
her in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , where she in the meanwhile would visit Bandar
'Abbas and then Basrah, returning from the latter port to Bandar 'Abbas j
after taking in Persian goods she was to sail for Surat. By this scheme,
it was hoped, different areas of trade would be linked up, profitable
exchanges initiated, and English navigation increased ; but the project
did not answer to the expectations of its framers and the experiment of
1682 was not, apparently, repeated. Among the reasons assigned by the
Agent and Factors at Bandar 'Abbas for its failure were the miserable
appearance of the " Dragon ", a vessel of only 180 tons, which cut a poor
figure beside the stately ships of Holland, and the fact—probably of
greater real moment—that the Mokha and Basrah markets could be
more conveniently served and tapped by the Surat and Bandar 'Abbas
Factories through Armenian dealers, etc., than by ships on circuit; they
recommended instead that good vessels, manned by Europeans, should be
sent in order to give Persian merchants confidence in the Company's
* That ia Qifilahs or caravans.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎73] (216/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000011> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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