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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎77] (220/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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77
The East India Company's Establishments in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
1653-1722.
Ihe estalilishmeuts of the East India Company in Persia fluctuated Staff.
dllring , this period according to the state and prospects of trade. Once in
I664 ; aswe have seen, the staff in Persia was reduced to two Europeans,
and, up to 1GB1 at least, there was no permanent European establishment in
Turkish 'Iraq. In 1682, when an attempt was made to place the Persian
trade on a better footing, Mr. John Gibbs was appointed to be Agent in
I ersia with a Council of four to assist him, of which the members were to
succeed to the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , should it become vacant by death or removal, in
order of seniority. In 1693, when the aspect of affairs had begun to
improve, the staff in Persia was augmented so as to consist of a
Chief Agent, four Factors and four Writers • and at this strength it
appears to have stood afterwards, unless the two Factors specially sent to
Tabriz and Mashhad in 1696 were, as seems not improbable, additional
employes. In 1676 there was a " Chyrurgeon at Bandar ■'Abbas,
a Mr. Samuell Carleton, whose relations with the other Company's servants
occasioned great trouble; and, from various references to " Europe wine "
sent from India for Padres," it might be supposed that the staff in Persia
were not without a chaplain ; but, on the other hand, burials seem to have
been generally conducted by themselves, so that by " Padres " foreign priests
or missionaries may have been meant.* There is nothing to show that
the Company's employes in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. were ever accompanied by
their wives or children.
Bandar 'Abbas was at first the principal Factory in Persia, and the Stations.
Factory building at that place was a gift from the Shah, standing between
the purchased premises occupied by the Dutch and the French. For a time,
perhaps, the establishments at Shiraz and Isfahan were either closed or
maintained on a reduced scale; but Mr. Craddock, when he was sent as
Agent to Persia in 1662, was authorised to spend some months of each
year at Shiraz or Isfahan, because " Death hath been so familiar in those
parts, caused by ill aire, staying so long in it at Gombroon and in 1684
it was expressly ordered that two of the Council should remain constantly
at Isfahan to watch the Company's interests there. In 1692 Isfahan was
selected as the centre at which Writers in Persia were to be trained; and
in 1693, when augmentation of the staff took place, the Chief Agent was
given liberty to reside at Isfahan or at Bandar 'Abbas as he pleased, and
* One of these Padres, however, was named Barnabj and drew a bill of exchange
upon the Company (1661).

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎77] (220/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000015> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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