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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎79] (222/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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79
In lf)77, when Dr. Fryer visited the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the inhabitants
of O'man had already acquired the reputation of "a Fierce and
Treacherous People, gaining- as much by Fraud as Merchandize." By
1695 they had taken to piratical courses and acquired five large ships
carrying 1,500 men; they had plundered Kung-; they had captured an
Armenian ship; and they had so threatened Bandar J Abbas that a Persian
customs officer on one occasion asked that the English ship " Nassau -'
might be detained for 20 days for the defence of the port, and the
lequest was granted. These events led Captain Brangwin, who was at
the moment the Company's Agent in Persia, to predict that the 'Omanis
u would prove as great a plague in India as the Algerines were in
Europe/' War between Persia and Masqat being- now expected, and
there appearing a probability that the Dutch would offer to assist the
Persians, the East India Company's servants in Persia were anxious
that English aid also should be tendered; but Sir John Gayer, the Gov
ernor of Bombay, wisely decided that, as the Arabs had not yet offered any
obstruction to English shipping or trade, such action would be inexpedient.
After this, however, a Masqat ship having been seized by Indian
pirates, the 'Omanis made reprisals on English private or interloping
vessels, but not on those of the Company; the first English vessel to be
seized was one commanded by a Captain Morrice, who with his men was
reduced to slavery and could not be ransomed; and in 1705 a rich ship
under Captain Murvel, bound from Bengal to Persia, was taken through
the pusillanimity of the crew, who made no resistance. In 1704-05 the
Court of the Old Company announced their intention of equipping
armed ships, as soon as the war with France should be over, to clear the
seas and " to root out that nest of pirates, the Muscat Arabs but
the French war continued, and in 1707 there were complaints of ; Omani
as well as of Marhata depredations in Indian waters. The aggressions
of the 'Omanis upon the Portuguese, especially in 1693-99 and 1714!-19 3
have already been noticed above.
Some years later the " Muscateers" seized certain islands off the
Persian coast, among which was apparently Qishm. A Persian army
under Lutf 'Ali Khan was sent into the neighbourhood of Bandar
'Abbas to dislodge them; in consequence, however, of the Afghan
invasions of Persia, which had now begun, this force returned northwards
to Kirman without having effected anything. Somewhat earlier, in 1718,
a successful descent had been made on Bahrain by the Masqat Arabs ;
but the inhabitants to a large extent temporarily forsook the islands, and
by this means the 'Omani occupation was brought to an end
Piracy and
aggressions
on Persia by
the 'Omanis.
1699-1707.
of
Seizure
Persian
islands by
the 'Omanis
of Masqat,
about 1720.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎79] (222/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000017> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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