Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎83] (226/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

(io$
JlotflCU S''
J."'
83
rendition of Azarbaijan to Pereia. These mearares promised success;
m t ey were frustrated by the pusillanimous behaviour of Shah Tahmasb,
who, after being defeated in a battle by the Turks, concluded a treaty with
Ahmad Pasha, the Turkish governor of Baghdad, whereby he resigned
is claims to all the countries beyond the Araxes in favour of the Sultan
and ceded Kirmansbah and its dependencies to the Pasha himself,
lahmasb Quli Khan immediately denounced this treaty as a betrayal of
the national interests; and not long afterwards, on the 16th of August
' ' . 6 et lone ^ ^ ie Shah, substituting for him a puppet in the person
o hie infant son, whom some historians have styled Shah 'Abbas III.
In July 1733 Tahmasb Quli Khan marched on Baghdad, which he
invested; but he was defeated near Samarrah by Topal 'Osman, a gallant
ur ish soldier, and obliged to abandon the siege. In less than three
months' time, however, he renewed his invasion of 'Iraq, overthrew a
urkish army under Topal 'Osman, who was slain in the battle, and
again prepared to invest Baghdad; but at this juncture a revolt broke
out m the province of Fare and recalled him to Persia.
In the spnng of 1756, eonsidering his position to be now sufficiently Reign of
established, Tahmasb Quli Khan assumed the name of Nadir Shah and Nadir Shah,
accepted the crown of Persia, which was offered to him by the nobles and 1736 ~ 47 '
mihtary chiefs of the realm; but, before doing so, he prevailed on
the electors to agree to the extraordinary condition that the Shi'ah sect
should be abolished and that the people of Persia should become Sunnis*
On ascending the throne Nadir Shah made a peace with Mahmud I,
Sultan of Turkey, by which the frontier that had bounded the two
empires m the time of Murad IV was restored j this done, he gave rein
* It was intended that the converted Persians should form a fi^h^SunnT^ectTtTbe
known as the Ja fan, distinct from the already existing Sunni sects of Hanafi. Shlfi'i.
Malik* and Hanbali; the name proposed was taken from that of Ja'far.as-Sadin
w lorn > i a s inspected as the sixth Imam and to whom Sunnis could not obiect as he
bve fte d^s before the SM'ah S cM sm . The recognition of the Ja'fari
the subject of a corrospondenca between Nadir Shah and the Sultan of Turkey ; but
e latter, though he agreed to proposals for a release of prisoners on both sides, for
tree trade, and for mutual reception of Ambassadors, would have nothing to do with the
rehgious scheme; and even in Persia the Ja'fari sect does not seem to have made
much real headway. The principal objects of Nadir Shah in his attempted innovation
were probably (1) to conciliate his a:my, which consisted partly of Sunnis . (2) to
facilitate the incorporation in the empire that he aspired to found of Sunni
countries such as India, Afghanistan and Turkey; and (3) to obliterate the recollec-
ion of the displaced Safavi dynasty, under whom the Sbi'ah faith had been the
na lon & J" 6 igion of Persia and with whom it was closely identified. Nidir Shah's
proceedings in this respect had evidently a great interest for Niebuhr ; see hig Vovaa"
Z IT' P " 1!M W ~ im - M toy Shi'ahfl in Turkey are iL
quently termed Ja'faris,
15 a

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎83] (226/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00001b> [accessed 22 May 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00001b">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;83] (226/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00001b">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0226.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image