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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎84] (227/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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84
to his ambition in other directions. One of his first exploits was the
subjugation of the Bakhtiyari tribe, which he accomplished in one short
campaign ; and, as is more fully related elsewhere, his troops crossed
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. in 1737, overran ^Oman in 1737-38, and were not
finally expelled from that country until 1744. Meanwhile the Shah had
undertaken offensive operations against his old opponents the Afghans, and
in 1738 he took Qandahar, after a siege begun in 1737, and also Kabul.
In 1739 he passed onwards to India, making it his pretext for an attack
on the Mughals that they had countenanced the Afghans. He defeated a
Mughal army in battle near Karnal and temporarily occupied Delhi, but
he was too wise to attempt the annexation of a country so extensive and
so far from his base, and after a short stay he returned to Persia. On his
homeward march Nadir detached to Sind a body of troops by which that
province was duly visited and the submission of its ruler obtained; and it
is even possible that he accompanied this force in person. Meanwhile, as
related in the separate history of Persian Makran, Taqi Khan, Baiglar-
baig of Fars, had entered Makran and apparently reduced a part of it to
obedience to the Shah. In 1740 Herat was added to the Persian domi
nions ; and in the following year Mash had became the capital of Persia.
By this time hostilities were once more in progress between Persia and
Turkey; but Nadir Shah, after gaining a final victory over the Turks
at Erivan in 1744, once more made peace with the Porte. Taqi Khan,
the commander of the Makran expedition and governor of Fars, rebelled
against the Shah in 1744, but he was at once surrounded in Shiraz;
and eventually, in attempting to escape from the town, he fell into
Nadir^s hands and was mutilated. The mind of the tyrant had now
become unhinged ; he had blinded his own son Riza Quli Khan, whom
he distrusted ; his * severity and cruelty towards his subjects during the
last five years of his reign knew no bounds ; and eventually, in 1747, he
was assassinated by four of his officers. Among the ambitions enter
tained by Nadir Shah was, as will appear further on, the possession of
a navy in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and he eventually succeeded in acquiring
some 20 or 25 vessels which were ordinarily kept at Bushehr. A few
of his ships are said to have been constructed at Bushehr and Rig)
but a design which he had formed of buildinsr an entire fleet with timber
conveyed by forced labour across Persia from the district of Mazandaran
remained unexecuted.
Tho tiaveller Kiebuhr remarked on the number of persons still to be scan in 1/66,
including even Arabs of Bahraio, who had been deprived of an eye in the reign of
Nadir Bhfth*

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎84] (227/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00001c> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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