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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎111] (254/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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[at]
in
nearly all the maritime Arabs of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. * About 1752 Shaikh
Nasir of Bushehr in alliance with Mir Nasir, the chief of Rig-, reduced
the island of Bahrain, possession of which during- the remainder of the
period under consideration he apparently retained by means of his fleet,
consisting, of one large vessel and a number of gallivats. In 1755 Shaikh
Nasir seems to have been imprisoned by Karim Khan, who had required
him to answer for the ships of the former Persian navy and to pay up
5,000 Tumans on account of the revenue of Bahrain during- the previous
^hree years,
. The histor ^ of tbe famil 7 w ho in 1755 held possession of Rig was very p osition at
similar to that of the Shaikhs of Bahrain. They were by extraction Za'ab in 1755.
Arabs from the coast of what is now Trueial 'Oman ; but the father of
Mir Nasir, who was chief in 1752 and who in or about that year granted
the Dutch permission to settle on the island of Kharag, had become a
Shi'ah, and Mir Nasir himself had married a Persian, so that the family
were no longer regarded as genuine Arabs. Mir Nasir was murdered,
between 1753 and 1755 at the instance of Mir Mahanna, the younger of his
two sons; and this youthful monster, who was present at the crime though
he did not actually participate in it, soon afterwards in a fit of fury
killed his own mother also for venturing to reproach him with his father's
death. Mir Mahanna's proceedings were however arrested by the return
from Bahrain, where he happened to be at the time, of his elder brother
Mir Husain; and the latter took possession of the government of Rig.
Such was the position of affairs when Mr. Francis Wood, formerly Mr. Wood
Agent at Bandar J Abbas, arrived at Rig to establish a British Factory
thert. This pioject had been sanctioned by the Court of Directors in Factory at
April 1754), and Mr. Wood's commission as Resident was issued at Hlg ' 1/55 *
Bombay on the 18th of October in the same year, but he did not start
from Bandar 'Abbas until March 1755. His instructions were to
promote the sale of British woollen manufactures at Rig; to take all
proper measures to hinder the merchants there from dealing in French
or other foreign woollens ; to discourage, so far as possible, the trade
of the Aleppo Adventurers in the same; to lend no money or goods to the
local authorities ; not to deal with native merchants except for ready
money; and, finally, to insist upon the privilege of collecting the customs
on all goods imported or exported by the British being granted him,
" as it will be for the Hon'ble Company's Credit and Honour, and a
means of alleviating their expenses." All controversy with the Dutch,
b i Ut it - is how Nasir could have recommended
himgplf to Nadir Shah hy becoming Shi ah ; see page 83.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎111] (254/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000037> [accessed 14 August 2018]

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