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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎122] (265/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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m
The trade in The Company's trade, and commereial arrangements in Turkish 'Iraq
Tuvkieh j (J |j described in the chapter on the history of that country.
Mrnn. ^
Establishments and general arrangements of the East India
Company in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , 1722-63.
Organization
and nomen
clature.
Personnel.
During the first half of the 18th century the words a Agent" and
"Factor/' f< Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. " and "Factory" appear to have been somewhat
indiscriminately used to describe the Company's servants and stations in
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and Persia; but by degrees the head of the Company's
interests in the whole of that region came to be known as a the Agent
and Bandar 'Abbas, being his headquarters, as " the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. ." The
Isfahan station, before its final closure, was frequently described as a
" Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. j " such also was the status of Basrah ; and, as both of these
places were subordinate to Bandar 'Abbas, we should perhaps under
stand that an "Agent", after about 1750 , corresponded with the
" Agent to the Governor-General" rather than with the ordinary
" Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. " of the present day. The Company's interests
in Kirman were represented sometimes by a European employe and
sometimes by a Linguist or native interpreter, and the station there
did uot belong to any particular class. The term " Honourable Com
pany," referring to the East India Company, was in Use in the Gulf as
early as 1737, or perhaps earlier; and the fact that the Company was
more than a society of merchants must have been recognized in 1762,
when the Shaikh of Bushehr urged that " an English Sarkar Factory
should be established at his port. That the distinction between " covenant
ed " or superior and other servants of the Company must have been
introduced before 1750 is shown by the following order issued by the
Bombay Presidency in that year : " And if the circumstances of their
" affairs at Spahaun absolutely requires a Covenant Servant to continue
"there some time longer, Mr. Dalrimple must be appointed to relieve
" Mr. Graves till such time as he can be recalled, for we would have no
" Covenant Servant reside there any longer than the necessity of those
' ill conducted affairs * may unavoidably require."
W ith regard to personnel we may remark on the large number of
Scotsmen among the Company's employes in the Gulf,— a feature distin
guishing this period from the last, which was mostly antecedent to the
'Apparently the inference is to Messrs. Pierson and Blandey's case—see pagt> 126 p 0 ^"

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎122] (265/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000042> [accessed 21 May 2018]

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