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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎138] (281/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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r r- -
-
Position of
the British
in India
1763-V5.
Transference
of the Persian
Gulf Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company.
from Bandar
'Abbas to
Basrah, 1763.
Overtures by
Karim Khan
to the British
138
dependent on Persia through the Shaikh of Bahrain. The only consider
able power in the Gulf besides Persia and Turkey was the Imamate of
^Oman ; which, having shaken off the yoke of Persia only a few years
previously was still inspired with anti-Persian sentiments and a strong
feelino- of nationality. The naval resources of the Imam ; however small
the military forces of which he disposed on land, were probably not
inferior to those of all the ports of Persia combined ; but he was seriously
incommoded, in operations abroad, by the necessity of defending his
north-western frontier against the Qawasim, with whom he was almost
always at war.
The British power in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was as yet represented, almost
exclusively, by the East India Company ; and the Company were at this
time fairly free from embarrassments in other quarters. In India the
progress of the Marathas had received a temporary check through their
defeat by the Afghans at Panipat in 1761. After the battle of Baxar
in 176i the dangers to be faced by the British in Bengal were no longer
so great as they had been ; and in 1765 the revenue administration of
that province passed into their hands. The first Mysore war, however,
ended unfavourably to the British in 1769 j and even the expansion of
their interests in India, under ('live and Warren H astings, must have
tended to withdraw the attention of the East India Company from
affairs in Persia and Arabia.
1 he A geney, or principal British establishment in the Gulf, was
removed at the beginning of 1763 from Bandar 'Abbas, where it had
ceased, from its isolated position and the constant prevalence of local
disturbances, to possess a commercial or even a political value. It was
located instead at Basrah in Turkish 'Iraq, absorbing a Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , which
had formerly been subordinate to it; and in 1764 it was expressly recog
nised by the Porte as a Consulate under the Capitulations. Mr. Trice,
the Agent specially deputed from India to inaugurate the new arrange
ments, was ordered to negotiate for a Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at Bushehr also, and did
so with success; but, in spite of the foot-hold thus retained in Persia,
the policy of the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. was dominated for some years from this date
by sympathy with its new Turkish surroundings, and verged on
hostility towards Persia. The transference of the British Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company.
fiom Persian to Turkish soil was thus an event of decided political
significance.
Kaiim Khan, on his part, was anxious enough to maintain friendly
relations with the representatives o£ the East India Company, for he

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎138] (281/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000052> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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