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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎140] (283/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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UnHuccessf'il
Anglo -Turkish
war against
the Ka 'abj
176B-66.
• :
140
Doraq, the capital of the Ka'ah country, as well as an important irriga
tion work belonging to the tribe; but the failure of the Turks to act in
concert with him, as they had promised, enabled the rebels to escape
further punishment at his hands by crossing to the western side of the
Shatt-al-'Arab.
In July 1765, only a few days after the Anglo-Persian attack upon
Mir Mahanna had been discontinued, a new and sudden turn was
given to political affairs in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. by the seizure in rapid
succession, by Ka'ab tribesmen, of three British vessels in the Shatt-a!-
'Arab : these were the "Sally" of two masts, an unnamed yacht
belonging to the Basrah Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , and the " Fort William " of three
masts. There is nothing to show whether the motives of the Ka'ab in
this case were merely piratical, or whether the tribe had come, in
consequence of the Khargu operations, to regard the British as
the allies of their oppressor Karim Khan. The Agent and Council
at Basrah, though aware that the Vakil had lately claimed the
KVab as his subjects by overrunning their country, applied to the
Turks for redress, so manifesting a distinctly anti-Persian bias;
and it was immediately arranged at Basrah that joint operations against
the Ka^ab should be undertaken by a Turkish army and a British fleet.
The Government of Bombay, approving of the scheme, equipped the
largest expedition that had sailed, at least for very many years, from
India for the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; it comprised four vessels of European build
and small detachments of European infantry and artillery. The Turks
were not yet ready to move when this armament arrived at Basrah, and
the'British began operations on their own account from Klior Musa; but
in May 1766, they experienced a sharp check, which seems to have
wanted but little in order to become a serious reverse. At last, after con
siderable delay, and under an agreement to pay 1,000 Tumans a month fo!
the assistance of the British fleet if continued beyond the end of June,
the Turks took the field; and concerted action followed, by land and sea,
during the months of July, August, and September. On one occasion an
attempt was made to recapture the "Sally" and "Fort Williamfrom
the Ka'ab, but it ended in their destruction by fire at their moorings. At
length, on the 23rd of September 1766, the British attempted to storm
some Ka'ab redoubts without the help of the Turks, who now pretended
to be waiting for the assistance from the Persian Government; hut the
result was a disastrous repulse in which Captain Brew T er, the military
officer commanding, was killed with a number of others, and some
guns and chests of ammunition were lost.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎140] (283/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000054> [accessed 14 November 2018]

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