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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎146] (289/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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146
Re-institution
of friendly
relations
between the
British and
Karim Khan,
1775.
Position of
the British at
Basrah and
Bushehr
during the
Persian occu
pation of
Basrah,
1775-79.
Effects of the
Persian occu
pation of
Basrah in
Bushehr ileet from below Basrah to join that of the Ka'ah, which had
already gone above the town, the Agent and Council became alarmed;
and on the Uth of April 1 77 5 they quitted Basrah for Bushehr, leaving
the Company's factory and the goods in it unprotected. On their
wav to the Gulf they engaged the Bushehr fleet, which was on its way
up the river, and drove them into the mouth of the Kaiun,
More useful assistfvnce was received by the links fiom the Imam of
'Oman, whose strong fleet in August 1 775 defeated a part of the Persian
navy, opened the navigation of the Shatt -al- ; Arab, and enabled the
defenders of Basrah to reprovision the town.
Meanwhile, on the very day that the siege of Basrah began, Mr.
Garden arrived at Bushehr on a mission from the Government of Bombay
to Karim Khan. For the sake of restoring good relations, if this could
not be done in any other way, he was authorised to re-establish a British
Factory at Bushehr, though this was contrary to the orders of the Court
of Directors ; and by an intelligent use of his powers he succeeded, not
only in procuring the release of Mr. Beaumont and the leturn of tli
" Tyger, JJ but also in arranging for the security of the Company s pio-
perty at Basrah in case the town should be taken by the Persians, b'
he did not so much as refer to the still outstanding claim for damages
on account of the Ka'ab piracies of 1765, perhaps from a consciousness
that it was now too old to be revived with decency or any chance f
success.
On the capitulation of Basrah the representatives of the East India
Company were at once replaced in possession of the Factory, which was
found undamaged; but the form of government established h}
Persians,—a purely military occupation in face of hostile sunoumlhigs,
—was unfavourable to trade, and the violence of the Persian Govei'iK
under Sadiq Khan gave frequent cause for complaint. Karim Khan,
is true, was always ready to correct abuses when brought to h -
but the outlook at Basrah was so disheartening that the ( onrt
Directors of the East India Company at one time contemplated a
entire withdrawal from the place, and the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. there was act y
reduced to the status of a Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. .
At Bushehr, where the local administration was as favourably
asthe Yakil himself, everything proceeded smoothly until the end
Karim Khan's reign.
A noteworthy consequence of the Persian occupation of Basra j 11 ^
the migration of a number of merchants to Kuwait and the lemou
others, who did not feel themselves secure even there, from Kuwait

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎146] (289/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00005a> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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