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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎149] (292/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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149
to extort from Persia a lease of Bandar 'Abbas, Minab, and the adjacent
islands.
Pining this period a series oc inconclusive wars in India threw a heavy Difficulties of
and almost continuous strain upon the resources of the East India Compan 1 hf 9 "
Company, thus hampering their action in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . Among the East aud
these contests were the first and second Maratha wars, from 1775 to ITVO - q ?!
1782, by winch the British gained little advantage; the second Mysore
war, from 1780 to 1784, which resulted in a mutual restitution of
conquests; and the third Mysore war, from 1790 to 1792, after which
Tipu Sultan was stripped of half his dominions, yet remained a dangerous
enemy.
At home also the East India Company had to contend with various
adverse occurrences, such as the movement which produced Fox's India
BilJ ol 1783, and the trial of Warren Hastings on an impeachment by
Fox, Burke and Sheridan, which opened in 1788 not to close before 1795.
From 1778 to 178 -3, in consequence of the French having taken the Hostilities
side of the British North American colonies, then in revolt against the BritX^d
mother country, there was war between Britain and France in the East. French in
Pondichery, restored to France by the Treaty of Paris in 1763 on condi- msS?'
tion of remaining unfortified, was again captured by the British in 7 778 1793 - 97 -
and retained until 1783 ; and in 1781, during the progress of the second
Mysore war, there was severe fighting with the French under Suffren in
Indian waters.
In 1793, the French Revolution having taken place in the meanwhile,
war was declared by Britain against France in Europe; and hostilities in
India followed. Before the end of the year Pondichery once more
succumbed to a British force, and the other French settlements of
Chandarnagar, Karikal and Mahe surrendered; but meanwhile French
war-vessels and French privateers from the Mauritius had begun to
ravage British commerce in the eastern seas ; and in the winter of 1793-
a British naval squadron was sent to deal with them in Javan waters.
In 1795 Holland became a party to the war on the side of France, with
the result that in 1795-96 a British expedition wrested Ceylon from the
Dutch. In 1796-97 French agents made their appearance in Persia and
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and in 1797 the British still continued to operate
against the possessions of the Dutch in the East Indies.
These difficulties in India with various native powers and with the British policy
French afford, together with the instability of the Persian Government, ar ! d rela tions
a sufficient explanation of the British policy in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. at the time, Peiaian Gulfi
which was wanting in strength and decision. The British relations with 1779 * 95r -

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎149] (292/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00005d> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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