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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎158] (301/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

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Formation of
the Secret
and Political
Department
of the Bom
bay Govern*
ment, 1785.
Services ren
dered hy the
Royal Navy
in the Persian
Gulf.
158
receipts from duties were divided into " customs " and " consulage,"
of which the former ordinarily amounted to 3 per cent, ad valorem
and went into the public treasury, while the latter was at the rate of 2
per cent, and was equally divided between the Governor of Bombay
and the * Agent or Resident at the port of collection. About 1773-75,
however, the total of the duties taken by the Company at Basrah seems
to have been 6 and not 5 per cent.; and from 1784? onwards half of the
consulage seems to have been carried to the credit of the Company
themselves, instead of to that of their ofRoers.
On the 11th of January 1785 the Government of Bombay resolved
to separate the secret and political part of their work from the rest; and a
Secret and Political Department, distinct from the Public Department,
was on that day established, with Mr. James Beck as its first Secretary.
Of the signatures appended to the resolution constituting it, one was
that of the Hon'ble Mr. R. H. Boddam, Resident and Governor, proba*
bly the same whof visited Masqat in 1769, and another that of Brigadier-
General Nilson, doubtless the officer who commanded the land troops in
the British attack on Kharag in 1768. All subordinates, including those
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , were immediately informed of the new arrange
ment.
The occasional employment of the Royal Navy in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
in support of the East India Company's marine, seems to have begun
during this period. The action of the Shaikh of Bushehr in 1770, when
he invited the Company to re-establish the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. withdrawn from
his port in the previous year, was attributed by the Agent and Council
at Basrah to " his apprehensions on hearing- of the arrival of one of His
Majesty's ships in the Gulph "; and in 1771, on the Agent and Council
clamouring for a strong expedition to be sent to the Gulf to chastise
Karim Khan and suppress piracy, the Court of Directors in London
passed the following remarkable, because novel, order: " If all efforts
<< to put an end to the piratical views of the Persians and other powers in
"the Gulph, and to procure reparation of injuries, without having recourse
" to arms, shall prove ineffectual, you are to represent the same to the
" Presidency, that they may lay it before the Commanding Officer of His
" Majesty's ^hips in the East Indies and endeavour to obtain such
" protection and assistance in the circumstances as the case shall require .
*■ During the time that Bushehr was a Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. under the Basrah Agewy>
however, half of the local ghare went to the Resident at Bushehr and half to the Agent
at Basrah.
| See chapter on the history of the 'Oman Sultanate.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎158] (301/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000066> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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