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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎164] (307/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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^ iff PI ^
Articles of
export from
the Persian
Galf.
164
drain on the monetary resources of Persia which this represented, tie
depredations o£ Nadir Shah in India had been nearly redressed. Turkish
gold was hardly obtainable ; the exchange was unfavourable to Turkey;
and remittances to foreign creditors were made by Turkish and Arabian
merchants, to a great extent, in gold of Venetian, Dutch and even
Hungarian mintage. The misfortunes which affected Basrah from
1773 to 1779 diminished its trade, and partially altered its commercial
haracter, bv keeping away those up-country merchants who had been
accustomed to resort to it as a purchasing market and to bring cash with
them from other parts of the Turkish Empire, Still more impoverish
ing, in their effect upon the Gulf region as a whole, were the wars
which for many years discouraged industry and interrupted coramunica
tions in Persia. The Shi'ah pilgrimages to Nay if and Karbala were
generally regarded as tending to deplete Persia of wealth without
bringing in any return; but it is obvious that, in this case, what was
lost to Persia was merely transferred to Turkish 'Iraq and not withdrawn
from the general trade of the Gulf.
The most precious export of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. consisted at this time,
as it does still at the present day, in pearls ; but the annual value
of the proceeds of the fishery, which as yet was almost entirely con
centrated in the Bahrain Islands, was estimated in 1790 at only * half a
million of Bombay rupees. In regard to this branch of trade it was
remarked ; " The principal part of the t pearl is conveyed from Bahreeii
a direct to Surat, and from Bahreen to Mocha [via Muscat), Bushire,
" Scindy, Surat and Calcutta, from which four last mentioned plau
" is circulated through Can<laliar, Multan, India, Taitaiy a'^l China.
"The remainder supplies the markets in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and in
" part finds its way, through the channels of the Levant, to .hobe of
" Europe."
The true exports of Persia were old copper, drugs, rosewatei,
dried fruits, raw silk, raw cotton, sulphur, and rock-salt. Ihoe t
Turkish ^Iraq were dates to the value of more than half a millio 11 o
Bombay rupees a year, old and new copper, gall-nuts, tobacco, opuau,
gum, catgut and pen-reeds, besides many horses to Surat and ll J ara
in India. There was besides a large transit trade through Basrah, n
* Captain J. Malcolm, however, writing only ten years later, estimated theanc
export of pearls at one million rupees.
f In old commercial phraseology, by what seems to us a curious
word " jjearl" is generally treated as a collective singular.
affectation, the

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎164] (307/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00006c> [accessed 19 October 2018]

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