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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎165] (308/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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165
numerous manufactured and ether articles, from Europe aud the Turkish
provinces beyond Baghdad to the countries of the Gulf aud to India
The leading articles imported hy way of the Gulf into both Persia
and Turkish Iraq were Bengal piece-goods, Coromandel chintzes, Madras
ong co co on yarn, and various cotton manufactures of Malabar,
Bioach, Cambay, Surat and Gujarat; English woollen goods; silks
Arab,an coffee; sugar and sugar candy; spices, eondimeuts and perfumes;
indigo; drugs ; chmaware ; aud metals. Of the Indian goods, muslins
and fine cotton oloths were from Bengal aud Madras, and coarser cloth
o-ood e T e R r S fr0m Sarat - The fale 0f En S ,ish ™ o11 ™
«oods at Basrah had declined by 1789 to about one-fourth of what it
had been twenty years earlier, and by 1796 it had almost entirely ceased,
eprmcipa • reasons for this being apparently its expensiven- ss and
the rivalry of cheaper and equally good French stuffs. The silks of
Bengal were preferred in Turkish 'Iraq to those of China, aud even to
those of Gilan The trade in eoffee was oue of great volume and
importance; half the produce of Yamau, it was estimated, found
i s way to the Gulf ; and from the Gulf not only the whole of the
surrounding countries, hut even parts of Europe, were supplied
Wi h the berry. America,n sugar, when its price was not too high, was
preferred to East Indian; but Batavian and Bengal sugars aL'com
manded a certain sale. Indian indigo was at this time expelling the
American article from the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. market, and local production of
the dye had began at Shushtar in 'Arabistan.
Light is thrown on the distribution of the foreign trade about this
time by a report from the pen of Captain J. Malcolm, written in 1800,
not long after the close of the period and before any marked change in
the situation had taken place. The total trade of the Gulf, export and
import, was placed by this authority at 160 lakhs of rupees a year,
mostly with India, 'i he annual imports from India into Persia were
Articles <if
impoit into
the Porsiaa
Gulf.
Distribution
»nd oi gani-
sation of
foreign trade
in the Gulf.
# These are the reasons adduced by the French traveller, M. Olivier. He adds
tnatthe former sale of Knglish woollens was only dne to the British East India
Company heme; un der an obligation to the British Government to dispose of a fixed
quantity of British manufactures (See page 51 ante), and that to satisfy this obliga*
tion they took and fold so much woollen cloth at a loss every year. When these
woollens ceased, in consequence of altered arrantjements, to be sold at a loss, they also
ceased, according to this authority, to be sal-able at all in oj position to French
oo ens. In regaid to this explanation the prppent writer can only siy that he has met
With nothing to corroborate it in British official or unofficial sources of information.
. ccoi ding to M. Olivier French woollens, satins, velvets, gold and silver cloth and
yens lace had a good sale in the Gulf region, and most of them went hs faj as Qaudahar.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎165] (308/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00006d> [accessed 21 May 2018]

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