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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎168] (311/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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168
m
iiecommenda-
tions as
regards estab
lishments.
In regard to methods of trade, they proposed that in future the absolute
rule against allowing credit to native customers, as also that against
bartering goods for goods, should be relaxed, and that the Company's
servants in the Gulf should instead be invested with a certain discretion
in regard to both matters. By this means it would be possible to secure
orders from reliable merchants, who could not afford to pay immediately
in cash in the great scarcity of specie that prevailed. With respect to
the consulage of 2 per cent, collected at Bushehr and Basrah, which was
formerly divided between the local Resident and the (rovernor of Bombay,
but of which half had since 1784 been credited to the Company's own
receipts, they suggested an important modification. Consulage had
hitherto been levied only on the goods of British merchants trading to
the Gulf, and since 1780 the number of these had become greatly reduced,
with the result that the consulage revenue had suffered diminution;
and Messrs. Manesty and Jones advised that the Armenian and Muham-
madan merchants residing in the Company''s settlements in India, by
whom the greater part of the trade under the Britisn flag was carried
on in vessels commanded and officerel by Englishmen, should be
made liable to consulage. They pointed out that the imports at Basrah
and Bushehr from ships under British colours had been worth nearly 20
lakhs of rupees in 1787, and that therefore, especially if peace were to
revive trade, the Company might derive substantial advantage from the
extended consulage.
The report of 1790 also suggested several changes in the Company s
official establishments. The Kesident at Bushehr, it was recommended,
should in future be Resident in Persia " with liberty to establish himself
either at Bushehr or at Shiraz, the capital of the country; a riter should
be given him to carry on routine duties at Bushehr ; and a surgeon skilled
in drugs should be posted to ^ 3 Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. as an adviser in the drug
trade. A British Faocory should be established at Masqat, if possible,
as it was a trade centre of the highest importance and an excellent place
at which to study the commerce of the whole Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . A formerly
existing Factory in Sind should be reinstituted, and a travelling servant
should be attached to it, whose duty it would be to visit Multan and, if
necessary, Qandahar : this recommendation had reference to a tradt
from Masqat to Afghanistan by way of the Indus valley which had
recently been opened up with some success by Bushehr merchants, and
the articles proposed for experiment were woollens and metals. A
servant, from Bombay, it was also advised, should be sent to Persia to study
at first hand the exportable products and the requirements in imported
goods of all the provinces of the country, and to report fully thereon.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎168] (311/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000070> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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