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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎173] (316/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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(iSM
fedeai i
^ maitt ?
'in%■(•;,.
Nfiatlj \ki-
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173
was induced to issue an edict for the arrest of any Frenchmen who might
be found in his dominions.
The mission of Mehdi ; Ali Khan was immediately followed by
another under Captain J. Malcolm of the Indian political service^ of
which the scope and objects were almost precisely similar : its despatch
was due to the initiative of Lord Mornington, Governor-General of
India. On the 17th January 1800^ Captain Malcolm obtained a renewal
of the agreement given by the Sultan of''Oman in 1798, as also a further
concession for the establishment of a political agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in charge of a
European officer at Masqat, to which Dr. Bogle was immediately
appointed ; and, very shortly after, the political representative of the late
Mysore Government disappeared from Masqat. In January 1801
Captain Malcolm concluded a political treaty with Persia of which the
effect, so far as the French were concerned, was to deny them a footing in
the country and to provide for joint operations against them by the
British and the Persians in case they should succeed in establishing
themselves there by force or fraud. A commercial treaty arranged by
Captain Malcolm at the same time contained no articles of note; and,
though he returned to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. by way of Turkish ■'Iraq, his
dealings with the Pasha of Baghdad did not go beyond an exchange of
formal courtesies.
In 1802 a Persian merchant named Haji Khalil Khan proceeded to
India on the part of the Shah of Persia to obtain the ratification by the
Governor-General, which was still required, of the treaties made with
Captain Malcolm in the previous year. This Persian Envoy was
accidentally and most unfortunately killed at Bombay in a brawl between
his own servants and a native guard of honour supplied by the Bombay
Government; and the negotiations, though the Envoy^s death was very
calmly received by the Persian Government, were interrupted.
In 1805, another Persian merchant, Muhammad Nabi Khan, was sent
to India as the successor of his relative the deceased Envoy ; but the
Government of India, of which the head had changed, were no longer
possessed by the sentiments which had inspired the mission of Captain
Malcolm; and in 1807, His Majesty^s Government to whom the matter
had been referred having shown themselves equally apathetic, the second
Persian Envoy returned home leaving the treaties still unratified.
Meanwhile a correspondence, which ended in the establishment of
regular diplomatic intercourse, had been opened between France and
Persia. The first overtures, which proceeded from the French Govern
ment,. seem to have been mado through agents of doubtful respectability
and to have been regarded in consequence with some degree of suspicion
First mission
of (Captain)
Malcolm to
the Persian
Gulf and
Persia, and
location of a
British
Political
Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. at
Masqat,
1799-1801.
Missions of
Haji KhaKl
Khan and
Muhammad
Nabi Khan to
India, 1802
and 1805-
1807.
'! (
I III
Intrigues of
the Freach in
Persia;
M issions of
Colonel
Eomieu,
M. Jaubert,

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎173] (316/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000075> [accessed 23 February 2018]

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