Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎177] (320/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

21
iS4
^ J flSj
■Kill
iik ff i-'
177
The obligation imposed on Britain in case of an invasion of Persia was
to hold good even if the invading power were at peace with Britain, but
in such ciicumstances Britain might first endeavour to bring about a
settlement by friendly intervention between Persia and the aggressor.
Provision was also made in the Treaty against the worn-out bogey of an
Afghan invasion of India. Mr. Morier, the secretary of the mission,
was at once sent to England to obtain ratification of the Treaty, which
he earned with him : he was accompanied by a Persian Envoy, Mirza Abul
Hasan, whose duty it was to inform himself, for his master's satisfac
tion, of the channel through which the subsidy mentioned in the Treaty
would be paid, in case it became due. About the end of April 1809 the
last of the French diplomatic agents quitted Tehran ; and by the end of
1S10 the French Consular Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. established at Masqat had been with
drawn. Notwithstanding the alarm, almost amounting to panic, which
the activity of the French at first excited in British India, it seems
probable that Napoleon's proceedings, at least after the collapse of his
Egyptian enterprise, were designed to keep Britain occupied and anxious
in the East rather than to prepare the way for any serious campaign
against her Indian possessions.
Early in 1810 General Malcolm was again deputed to Persia by Lord Third mlssioa
Minto, partly as evidence of the Government of India's approval of the MalcdtrTto 1 ^
Treaty arranged by Sir H. Jones, partly to restore the credit of the 1>er3k ' 1810 -
Indian Government in Persia, which was supposed to have suffered by the
repulse of their last mission, followed as it immediately was by the
triumphant success of the rival Envoy, and partly, it would seem, in
order that the Governor-General might have a representative on the
spot ready to assume the duties of permanent Envoy at the Persian
Court, in case, as he had recommended in correspondence with the Home
Government, the appointment of the Envoy at Tehran should be left to
himself. General Malcolm was also directed to make a geographical
study, so far as feasible, of Persia and the countries adjacent to it; and
to enable him to carry out this duty, and also to add to the impressive-
ness of the mission, he was provided with a large and brilliant staff of
officers. His Majesty's Government had decided, however, that the
appointment of Envoy at Tehran should for the future be filled from
England ; and General Malcolm accordingly, after a purely formal visit
to the Shah, returned to India. On this occasion again he passed
through Baghdad on his homeward journey, but an internal revolution
was at the time in progress at the headquarters of the Pashaliq and
prevented the transaction of any political business with the local
Government.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎177] (320/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000079> [accessed 19 October 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000079">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;177] (320/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000079">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0320.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image