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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎193] (336/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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IS:.'
193
which remained almost continuously at war with both. In 1811 Saiyid
Sa^id took an active part in compelling the Wahhabis to relinquish their
hold on Qatar and Bahrain ; and the Wahhabi governor stationed in
Bahrain was at the same time actually made a prisoner by him, or by
his allies the A1 Khalifah of Bahrain. It is possible tbit the A1
Khalifah, as afterwards asserted by the Sultan of ^Oman, were moved,
whether by gratitude or by considerations of expediency, to admit their
political ^opojjdence upon Masqat. Irom 1813 onwards the 'Omani
ruler was in correspondence with Muhammad ; Ali Pasha of Egypt in
regard to measures to be taken against the Wahhabis and the Qawasim;
and in that year and in the next, having failed to secure the active
support of the British, he made efforts on his own account to reduce the
Qasimi capital of Ras-al-Khaimah; but the only result was a treaty,
soon disregarded, by which the Qawasim bound themselves to refrain
from preying on the inhabitants of certain coasts claimed by the Sultan
as under his protection.
The attitude of the Government of India towards the Wahhabis and
the Qawasim during the critical years immediately following the expedi
tion of 1S09-10 was undecided; and, largely in consequence of their in
decision, the fruits of that considerable effort were in the end altogether
lost. The Wahhabi envoy who visited Persia in 1811 or 1812 did not fail
to make overtures to the British Resident at Bushehrfor the establishment
of mutual amity and commercial relations between their respective states ;
but the Government of India seemingly hesitated to pronounce on the
question until 1814, when they decided, without prejudice to the mainten
ance and even encouragement of friendly intercourse, to avoid entering into
a treaty with the Wahhabi Amir. The Sultan of ■'Oman, before embarking
on his expedition of 1814 against Ras-al-Khaimah, tried to persuade the
British authorities in India to make common cause with him against the
Qawasim, and argued that the Agreements of 1798 and 1800 between
himself and the British power constituted an offensive-defensive alliance
under which it was impossible for them to ignore his request; but the
validity of his contention was not admitted, and no naval or military
assistance was afforded him. The British Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
however, under orders from Government, accompanied the "'Omiini fleet
to Ras-al-Khaimah upon two occasions ; but no opportunity apparently
presented itself, as had been hoped, for intervention by him with advan
tage to British interests. Towards the end of 1814, in connection with
demands made by the British Resident for reparation in a particular case,
an emissary bearing letters from the Wahhabi Amir and the Shaikh of
22
5 0 inan agram*
the Wahhabis
in Qai ar and
Bahrain,
1811, and
war between
hitn and the
Qawasiic,
1813-1814.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎193] (336/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000089> [accessed 19 August 2018]

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