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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎195] (338/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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195
Dowlut, ;; with a wholly Indian complement, was captured by Ilas-al-
Khaimah corsairs near Dwarka, and the bulk of hev people were either
slain 01 wounded; and in the same month a considerable Qasimi
squadron engaged the Company's cruiser "Aurora" while convoying
a treasure vessel for the Sultan of ; Omau in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , but
suffered defeat and heavy loss. Attacks which were next made by
Qasimi pirates upon the American ship "Persia, " the " Macaulay," and
the " Cintra were unsuccessful; but a French schooner, on her way
fiom Mauritius to Basrah "under convoy of a French ship, was
daringly plundered. Among the victims of Arab lawlessness, which
now followed one another in rapid succession, was a ship of unknown
name under British colours, which was never seen again and of whose
crew none survived; also the Company's armed boat " Turrarow."
Later in the year three native Surat merchantmen were taken by
Qawasim in the Eed Sea, this affair involving a loss to the owners
of about twelve lakhs of rupees, besides which almost the entire crews
were massacred.
The above list of outrages is probably not exhaustive even in regard
to British and Indian vessels, and it takes almost no account of the
depredations upon ordinary Arab and Persian shipping, which the British
authorities did not at this time regard as a matter affecting themselves.
The spectacle of the offences committed by the Qawasim with profit and
impunity did not fail to demoralise a number of the Arab Shaikhs upon
the Persian Coast opposite, and the Bahrain Islands became a great
market and distributing centre in the Gulf for the stolen property which
the Qawasim acquired by their violence.
An expedition by the Sultan of 'Oman against Bahrain provided, Attack by the
in the summer of 1816, an interlude in the harrowing'drama of Qasimi Fulton cf
. . . Oman upon
outrages. In 1811 Saiyid Sa'rd had taken action in Bahrain as the Bahrain and
friend of the 'Atbi ruling family and their helper against the Wahhabis; th^BrHmh 0f
but now, on their denying the political allegiance which he claimed from
them as his due, he appeared once more on the scene as the ally of Persia therewith,
and of their mortal enemy, the pirate Rahmah-bin-Jabir, while they on
their part sought the aid of their former oppressors the Wahhabis and of
the piratical Qawasim. The Sultan encouraged the idea that his action
was countenanced^ and would even be supported, by the British Govern
ment ; but the Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , who visited Bahrain while
the 'Omani attack was impending, found means to convince the Shaikh
of Bahrain, though not without the execution of an unauthorised agree
ment, that the attitude of the British towards him was one of benevolent
^24

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎195] (338/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00008b> [accessed 26 May 2018]

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