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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎200] (343/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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200
ment. but no action appears to have been taken by them on this part
rvf their instructions. The project of a British " central station " ia the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , which mig-ht ultimately supersede for all purposes, the East
India Company's settlements at Bushehr and even Masrah, wag revived
in connection with the expedition of 1819-20; and General SirW,
Grant Keir, at his departure from India, was instructed to report on the
question with especial reference to the islands of Qishm and Hanjam,
In the end, as Ras-al-Khaimah, where arrangements were at first made
for installing- the permanent British garrison, was found to
be unsuitable, the General recommended the transfer of the troops
to Qishm ; but he deprecated the immediate removal, which
had been suggested, of the British Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
to the same place. Advantage was accordingly taken of a claim asserted
by the Sultan of J Oman to possession of Qishm in his own right—and
not as a leaseholder under the Persian crown, which he was in the case
of Bandar Abbas, to obtain from him written permission to occupy
that island; and in July iSiiO the British detachment left at Ras-al-
Khaimah was transferred to Qishm town. The new station, however,
pio\ed intolerably hot and unhealthy ; and, after Dairistan and Salagh
on the south coast of the island had been tried and found unsuitable,
the garrison, early in 1822, was established at Basidu.
The occupation of Qishm provoked, as seems to have been foreseen,
extieme resentment on the part of the Persian Government who absolutely
denied the title of the Sultan of "'Oman to independent sovereignty over
Qishra, and who even, by way of rejoinder, claimed the Sultanas domi"
nions in Arabia as an appendage of Persia. Dr. J ukes, who was sent
to Shlraz in the summer of 1821 to explain matters, seems to have
succeeded in reconciling the Persian Governor of Fars to the accomplished
fact of the British occupation of Qishm; but no argument which the
British representative at Tehran could adduce had any effect on the
mind of the Shah or his ministers ; and they continued to demand, as
they had done from the first, the withdrawal of the British detachment.
Eventually the authorities in India arrived at the conclusion that it
would be better to evacuate the island than to be constantly at issue
a ith Persia in regard to it; but a sudden rupture of relations between
Persian monarch and the British Charge d^Alfaires at Tehran, which
r^d in the spring of 1822, made it inexpedient to appear to comply
he wishes of the Persian Government until the end of that year or
-ginning of 1823. Then at length the Qishm detachment, which
y sen ed no useful purpose, was removed to India.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎200] (343/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000090> [accessed 19 October 2018]

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