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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎203] (346/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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o.
208
revival of piracy. The essential feature of the new system was continu- for P rc "
servation of
ous cruising off the Pirate Coast by three or four vessels of the East order at sea,
1822-23.
India Company^s marinej of which six in all were now allotted to the
service of the Gulf. It was ordered that ; in cases of piracy committed
by denizens of the Persian coast, direct action should not be taken in
future by British political or naval officers, but that application should be
made to the Persian local authorities, or in case of need to the Persian
Government, who since the punishment of the Qawasim had professed
themselves able and willing to deal effectually with such offences when
committed by their own subjects. Masqat was at first the place of
rendezvous of the Indian Government vessels employed in, or visiting, the
Gulf; but it was found too distant from the principal field of British
naval activity to be convenient, and a resolution was taken to substitute
Mughu, where a depot of stores would be located and a native political
agent appointed. The Mughu arrangement possibly came into force for
a short time; but in the autumn of 1823; on account of apprehended
objections on the part of the Persian Government, Rasidu on the island
of Qishm was adopted instead as the British naval base in the Persian
Gulf.
On the withdrawal of the British detachment and its commanding Special in-^
officer from Qishm, the political supervision of the whole Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
the Resident
on the part of the Indian Government devolved on the British Resident (^If^ndToor
at Bushehr; and special instructions were given to Lieutenant j^ e h ™ a °^ n
McLeod, the successor of Captain Bruce, as to the manner in which his coast, 1823.
duties as Resident, particularly under the General Treaty of Peace of
1820, should be performed. It fell to him to explain the requirements of
the Treaty, which were not so well known or understood as might have
been expected, to the signatories ; to give effect, so far as possible, to
certain of its provisions-—such as that rendering obligatory the use of a
distinctive flag—-which had been neglected ; and to make it evident that
the withdrawal of the British military garrison hitherto maintained in
the Gulf did not proceed from any loss of interest on the part of
Governmert in the maintenance of security at sea. He was also directed
to establish personal touch with the various Shaikhs of the Arab coast, to
investigate closely the political conditions prevailing, and to make
arrangements for obtaining regular information of passing events.
These tasks were admirably discharged by Lieutenant McLeod, who in
January 1823 made a voyage—almost of discovery along the Arabian
littoral, visiting the chief ports of the Pirate Coast, Qatar and Bahrain,

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎203] (346/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000093> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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