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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎205] (348/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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205
destruction, and to restore as mucb o£ the stolen property as could be
recovered. The only crime against a British vessel was the unceremoni
ous boarding of the " Sunbury " in 1829 at Sharjah, to the Shaikh of
which place her cargo had been sold ; but it was expiated, though due in
part to a misunderstandings by the burning of a boat implicated and the
flogging of a conspicuous offender under orders from the Shaikh. In
1831 the Shaikh of ''Ajman, who was then at war with the inhabitants
of Sohar, began to raid indiscriminately vessels from all places in the
'Oman Sultanate and captured more than a dozen which did not belong
to Sohar ; but in 1832 he was called to account by a British naval force
which visited his port and obliged him to make full reparation to the
sufferers by his wrongful seizures. In 1834 the British squadron in
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was reduced to two vessels ; and, partly no doubt for
this reason, but partly also in consequence of the passionate excitement
aroused by a bitter struggle in 1833-31 between Sharjah, the greatest
of the Pirate Coast Shaikhdoms, and Abu Dhabi, the next in strength,
the hitherto blameless Bani Yas tribe of the last mentioned principality
betook themselves to piracy. After committing a series of atrocious
massacres and robberies at sea, the Bani Yas proclaimed their intention
of trying conclusions with the slender naval force maintained by the East
India Company in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; but the British were equally
eager, and with better reason, for the encounter; and on the 16th April
1835 the Company's sloop-of-war a Elphinstone ^ engaged and utterly
defeated a piratical Yasi fleet of six vessels, severely damaging two, and
rescuing a large Persian ship which they had recently taken. The humi
liation of the tribe was so extreme that they agreed, without further
coercion, to a most stringent settlement under which they surrendered
fifteen captured vessels and a considerable amount of cargo, paid up
$10,000 as compensation in cash, and gave ample security for the pay
ment of an additional sum of |1,600. They also released all the pri
soners that they had taken, and delivered up two of their own number who
had been ringleaders in the recent outrages, one of whom was afterwards
convicted of piracy at Bombay and sentenced to transportation for life.
Several piracies were committed in 1834-35 by the Bani las of Dibai,
as well as by those of Abu Dhabi; but in these cases also satisfaction was
rigorously exacted.
The stern punishment inflicted on the pirates in 1835 may be regard
ed as the death-blow to piracy in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , for it never again
showed itself there in any formidable shape.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎205] (348/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000095> [accessed 14 November 2018]

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